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California Wine Sales in U.S. Market Hit $40 Billion in 2018

6월 24, 2019

SAN FRANCISCO — California wine shipments in the U.S. reached an estimated retail value of $40.2 billion in 2018, up 3% from the previous year. The state shipped 248 million nine-liter cases to the U.S. in 2018, up 3%.

California wine sales to all markets, including shipments to the U.S. and export markets, were 285 million cases in 2018.

“Consumer interest in premium wines continues to be the dominant trend,” said Robert P. (Bobby) Koch, Wine Institute President and CEO. “As consumers trade up, our California wines are emphasizing high quality, value and sustainable winegrowing.”

“California wine shipments experienced a 15% volume growth in the U.S. over the last decade, and increased 6 million cases in 2018 over the previous year,” said Jon Moramarco, founder and managing partner of BW 166 LLC, and editor of the Gomberg Fredrikson Report. “Baby Boomers are still the driving force in wine consumption, but while sales are still growing, it’s slowing as the Boomer generation ages and presumably drinks less. Wine marketers are working to maintain the interest of Boomers and attract Gen X’ers and Millennials with new and different wines.”

Moramarco also noted that direct-to-consumer wine sales continue to grow as important channel with over 6 million cases sold with a retail value of $3 billion in 2018, an increase of 9% in volume and 12% in value over the previous year.

2018 California Wine Stats Graphic

“Consumers are drinking better but not a lot more, as overall alcohol per capita consumption has changed very little,” said Danny Brager, Senior Vice President of Nielsen’s Beverage Alcohol Practice Area. “They are being more mindful of drinking in moderation, thus underlining a trend to smaller serve packaging, and seeking ‘experiences’ in a wide variety of eating and drinking venues such as theaters, museums, concerts, festivals, sports/activity venues, ‘groceraunts’ and other premises offering combined experiential and food/drink occasions. This diverse landscape has resulted in wine selling locations in the U.S. being up 8.5% from five years ago to 567,000 off- and on-premise locations.”

Brager explained that consumers are also shopping more online and want a convenient and effective online browsing and shopping experience. Adopting e-commerce platforms to make wine more accessible to consumers is having an impact on wine sales. Alternative packaging such as 3-liter boxes and cans is another trend expanding occasions to enjoy wine.

According to Nielsen-measured U.S. off-premise sales, top-selling varietals by volume share are: Chardonnay, 18.6%; Cabernet Sauvignon, 14.6%; Red Blends, 10.6%; Pinot Grigio/Gris, 9.7%; Merlot, 6.4%; Moscato/Muscat, 6.2%; Pinot Noir,5.2%; Sauvignon Blanc, 5.1%; White Zinfandel/Blush, 3.6%; and Rosé, 2.7%. Rosé continues to show phenomenal growth, with sales volume jumping 46% compared to 2017.

Total shipments of sparkling wine and champagne to the U.S. reached 27.4 million cases in 2018. Up 4% from the previous year, sparkling wines/champagnes accounted for a 7% share of the U.S. wine market.

The U.S. Wine Market

Wine shipments to the U.S. from all production sources—California, other states and foreign producers—grew 1% to 406.5 million cases in 2018, with an estimated retail value of $68.1 billion. The U.S. has remained the world’s largest wine market by volume since 2010 and the U.S. is now the third leading global wine producer. California’s 245 million cases shipped within the U.S. in 2018 represent a 61% share of the total U.S. wine market.

U.S. Wine Exports

U.S. wine exports, 95% from California, reached $1.46 billion in winery revenues in 2018. Volume shipments were 375 million liters or 41.7 million cases. The European Union’s 28-member countries were the top market for U.S. wine exports, accounting for $469 million; followed by Canada, $449 million; Hong Kong, $130 million; Japan, $93 million; China, $59 million; Mexico, $27 million; South Korea, $25 million; Nigeria, $15 million; Dominican Republic, $14.4 million, and Singapore, $14 million.

CALIFORNIA WINE SHIPMENTS1

(In millions of 9-liter cases)

Year California Wine Shipments to All Markets in the U.S. and Abroad2 California Wine Shipments to the U.S. Market2 Estimated Retail Value of CA Wine to U.S.3
2018 284.8 248.1 $40.2 billion
2017 280.5 241.8 $38.7 billion
2016 280.8 240.3 $37.1 billion
2015 279.4 234.8 $35.4 billion
2014 277.6 233.0 $33.8 billion
2013 266.1 221.4 $30.6 billion
2012 257.8 214.3 $31.2 billion
2011 270.2 224.1 $30.5 billion
2010 254.7 210.1 $30.4 billion
2009 255.6 213.3 $30.7 billion
2008 254.5 208.4 $27.3 billion
2007 245.8 200.39 $26.0 billion
2006 239.3 196.6 $26.6 billion
2005 233.5 193.8 $24.1 billion
2004 221.4 182.2 $22.2 billion
2003 209.1 177.0 $20.8 billion
2002 194.9 168.4 $21.5 billion

Sources: Wine Institute and BW166/Gomberg-Fredrikson Report. Preliminary. History revised.
1 Includes table, sparkling, dessert, vermouth, other special natural, sake and others. Excludes cider.
2 Excludes bulk imports bottled in California.
3 Estimated retail value includes markups by wholesalers, retailers and restaurateurs.

WINE SALES IN THE US

(Wine shipments in millions of 9-liter cases from California, other states and foreign producers entering U.S. distribution)

Year Table Wine1 Dessert Wine2 Sparkling Wine/
Champagne
Total Wine Total Retail Value3
2018 338.7 40.4 27.4 406.5 $68.1 billion
2017 336.1 40.8 26.4 403.3 $65.3 billion
2016 332.0 41.2 24.4 397.6 $63.3 billion
2015 324.7 40.2 21.7 386.6 $60.5 billion
2014 323.4 34.6 19.8 377.8 $56.8 billion
2013 326.2 31.6 18.4 376.2 $53.4 billion
2012 319.1 30.3 17.5 366.9 $51.7 billion
2011 307.6 31.4 17.2 356.2 $50.3 billion
2010 291.4 28.9 15.3 335.6 $47.7 billion
2009 287.7 27.2 13.9 328.8 $45.6 billion
2008 273.1 27.7 13.5 314.3 $44.7 billion
2007 273.3 26.7 13.8 313.8 $43.7 billion
2006 259.4 24.3 13.6 297.3 $42.2 billion
2005 253.5 22.5 13.1 289.1 $39.5 billion
2004 245.3 20.3 13.2 278.8 $36.2 billion
2003 237.0 17.6 12.0 266.6 $34.0 billion
2002 222.6 15.9 11.5 250.0 $33.0 billion

Sources: Wine Institute, Department of Commerce, Estimates by BW166/Gomberg, Fredrikson & Associates. Preliminary. History revised. Excludes exports. Excludes Cider. Totals may not add up exactly due to rounding.
1 Includes all still wines not over 14 percent alcohol, including bulk imports bottled in the U.S.
2 Includes all still wines over 14 percent alcohol and sake, including bulk imports bottled in the U.S.
3 Estimated retail value includes markups by wholesalers, retailers and restaurateurs. Includes on- and off-premise expenditures.

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MEDIA CONTACT:
Wine Institute Communications Department, 415/356-7525
communications@nullwineinstitute.org

New Consumer Research Presented at First U.S. Sustainable Winegrowing Summit Shows Strong Interest in Sustainable Wine

6월 20, 2019

Summit Banner

SAN FRANCISCO — The California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance (CSWA), with wine and grape association partners from New York, Oregon and Washington, and others around the country hosted the inaugural U.S. Sustainable Winegrowing Summit | West on June 6-7 in Sonoma County. A highlight of the Summit was a presentation by Lulie Halstead, CEO of Wine Intelligence, on consumer perceptions of sustainable winegrowing. The research indicated high interest in purchasing sustainably produced wine in the future, a favorable perception of sustainable certification programs and certification logos, and a willingness to pay more for sustainably produced wine, particularly by Millennials and Gen Z.

St Francis Winery Tour
The Summit kicked off with tours at Benziger Family Winery and St. Francis Winery & Vineyards.

The Wine Intelligence consumer research was based on an April 2019 survey of 2,000 regular wine consumers (U.S.), three domestic focus groups and surveys in Canada, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Among the key findings:

  • While organic wine is more universally understood, sustainably produced wine has the highest future purchase consideration, with 74% of U.S. respondents indicating that they would consider buying sustainably produced wine in the future.
  • In Canada, Sweden and the UK, sustainably produced wine had the highest percentages for future purchase consideration – 70%, 60% and 63% respectively, except in Sweden where organic still ranked higher (68%).
  • The survey also questioned affinity (“right for me”) and sustainably produced again performed well across countries – U.S. (68%), Canada (65%), Sweden (60%) and UK (56%).
  • For U.S. consumers, sustainable wine is most strongly associated with U.S. States and, in particular, California.
  • Millennials lead the way in purchasing from the range of sustainably and environmentally produced wine, and nine in 10 are “willing to pay” more for sustainably produced wine. Among all U.S. wine consumers, $3 was the average extra value that consumers indicated they were “willing to pay” for a sustainably produced wine.
  • Younger consumers (Millennials and Gen Z of legal drinking age) are significantly more engaged with sustainability, viewed as increasingly important to protect the future, and sustainable wine certifications have a strong appeal for younger drinkers, particularly Millennials.
  • Consumers seek easy ways to find and identify sustainable wine such as clear and simple visual cues or clearly identified sections in a store. Sustainability certifications for wine provide transparency and reassurance. While “Award Winning” endorsements deliver the most reassurance and positive impact on likelihood to buy, both CSWA’s Certified California Sustainable Winegrowing (California CERTIFIED SUSTAINABLE) logo and a generic Certified Sustainable logo were viewed as credible and visually appealing. When explicitly tested, wine endorsed with a CSWA logo yields the highest likelihood to buy among U.S. wine consumers.
  • While winery websites and wine tasting events are more effective at communicating wine sustainability, wine labels and peer recommendation are more frequently used sources.

Alternative Wine Styles: Consideration by Country
% who would consider buying the following alternative wine styles in the future.
Base = All aware of the following alternative wine styles

Research Graph
Light blue = Top 3 in each segment (exc. small sample size). Dark gray = Small sample size (n<50). Sources: Wine Intelligence, consumer focus groups in LA, April 2019, n=3 groups; Wine Intelligence, Vinitrac© U.S. (n=2,000), Canada (n=2,479), Sweden (n=1,000) and U.K. (n=1,000), April 2019 U.S., Canadian, Swedish and U.K. regular wine drinkers.

About the U.S. Sustainable Winegrowing Summit

Six states were represented among the 65 summit attendees at the inaugural U.S. Sustainable Winegrowing Summit | West, which included regional winery and vineyard associations, grower and vintner leaders, and other organizations committed to the sustainability of local vineyards, wineries and regions. Several panels explored “the value of sustainability” from the perspective of vineyards and wineries, other industries and trade, as well as lessons learned from various U.S. state sustainability programs. A second Summit, the U.S. Sustainable Winegrowing Summit | East will be held in New York in 2020.

In California, which produces more than 80% of U.S. wine, vineyards and wineries that represent the vast majority of the state’s acreage and wine production are participating in the California Sustainable Winegrowing Program and other educational and certification programs and adopting sustainable practices. In fact, 85% of California wine is now made in a Certified California Sustainable Winery and more than 40% of California’s statewide acreage is certified to Certified California Sustainable Winegrowing, Lodi Rules, Napa Green and/or SIP Certified. Other programs that were included on the program panel at the Summit include Long Island Sustainable Winegrowing, Washington Wine’s Vinewise/Winerywise, and LIVE Certified.

The Summit’s keynote speaker, Karen Ross, California Department of Food and Agriculture Secretary, highlighted the impressive progression of sustainable winegrowing in the U.S. wine industry, and the unique ways in which winegrowing regions around the country are interconnected – with a common bond of dedication to future generations.

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MEDIA CONTACT:
Wine Institute Communications Department, 415/356-7525
communications@nullwineinstitute.org

 

Summit Hosts:

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Summit Sponsors:

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Travel California Wine Country’s Back Roads This Summer: Sierra Foothills Spotlight

6월 3, 2019

Wine Institute Series Highlights the Wine Roads Less Traveled

SAN FRANCISCO — California is home to dozens of distinct wine regions, including some of the world’s most famous destinations. But hidden among even the high-profile appellations are the wine roads less traveled featuring stunning rural scenery, delicious wines and, often, fewer visitors. To help consumers discover new wines and wineries this summer, Wine Institute’s California Wine Country Back Roads series highlights off-the-beaten path wine roads and regions.

 

SIERRA FOOTHILLS WINE REGION

The California Gold Rush from 1848-1855 occurred in the heart of the Sierra Foothills wine region which covers 2.6 million acres of rolling hills, old mining towns and several of the coolest and highest elevation vineyards in the state. The region is a haven for small, family-run wineries known for their rich history, 100-plus-year old grapevines and full-bodied red wines, located throughout eight counties—Amador, Calaveras, El Dorado, Mariposa, Nevada, Placer, Tuolumne and Yuba. Here, visitors can enjoy pairing the latest vintages with some of California’s spectacular scenery, as this wine region has three national parks and 20 wilderness areas that include Yosemite National Park and Lake Tahoe.

El Dorado County Spring Vineyard
El Dorado County has more than 70 wineries and mountain vineyards that produce more than 70 winegrape varieties. Photo credit Lava Cap Vineyard.

TASTE: The Sierra Foothills region is home to more than 200 wineries and a diverse range of grape varieties. Amador County, tucked into the western foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountain range, includes more than 40 wineries—many specializing in Zinfandel, Barbera and Rhône-style wines. In Calaveras County, where Mark Twain gave the county its claim to fame with his bestselling story “The Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,” there are more than 25 tasting rooms on the charming Main Street of Murphys. El Dorado County, with its mountain vineyards perched high above the valley, features 70 wineries producing everything from Cabernet-based varietals to wines made from Rhône, German, Italian and Spanish grape varieties. Back-road gems can also be found in Nevada County, Placer County and Yuba County. For a taste of several sub-regions, take a scenic excursion up historic Highway 49. The road begins in Oakhurst, then winds its way north through several winery-rich counties, including Amador, Calaveras, El Dorado, Nevada and more.

Gnarly Vines Murphy's Hotel
Visitors can attend Amador County’s Barbera Festival and might also go past 140-year-old vines. Photo courtesy Deaver Vineyards. In Murphys, Calaveras County, there are over 25 wine tasting rooms and the historic Murphys Hotel along Main Street. Photo courtesy Calaveras CVB.

TOUR: Celebrate local wine, food and agriculture June 20-21 during the Placer Wine Trail’s Grape Days of Summer, a self-guided tour that features food, music and educational experiences at every stop in Placer County. Amador County’s annual Barbera Festival in September during California Wine Month offers tastes from more than 50 local wineries, plus fabulous food, live music and artisan vendors. Also, in September is the WineDerLust Renegade Wine Festival in Placerville, a wine bazaar and concert showcasing the best of El Dorado wines.

Placer County Grape Days
Visitors enjoy wine in a cavern tasting room during Placer County Wine Trail’s Grape Days of Summer. Photo courtesy of Placer County Wine Trail.

For more information on lodging, dining and upcoming events, see Amador County Vintners, Calaveras Winegrape Alliance, El Dorado Wines, Go Nevada County and Placer Wine Trail.

For all of the wine regions included in this series, use the discovercaliforniawines.com interactive map to search wineries by amenities such as tours, gardens and picnic areas, and view winery events around the state.

To see Wine Institute’s Back Roads guides to other California wine regions, visit https://discovercaliforniawines.com/media-trade/news.

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MEDIA CONTACT:
Wine Institute Communications Department, 415/356-7525
communications@nullwineinstitute.org

Summer Travel on California Wine Country Back Roads: Part 1, North Coast

5월 20, 2019

Wine Institute Series Highlights the Wine Roads Less Traveled

SAN FRANCISCO — California is home to dozens of distinct wine regions, including some of the world’s most famous destinations. But hidden among even the high-profile appellations are the wine roads less traveled, featuring stunning rural scenery, delicious wines and, often, fewer visitors. To help wine lovers discover new wine roads and wineries this summer, Wine Institute’s California Wine Country Back Roads series highlights off-the-beaten path wine roads and regions. The five-part series begins with the back roads of California’s North Coast.

 

SONOMA COUNTY

Home to nearly 500 wineries, plus green valleys, rolling hills, regal redwoods and 55 miles of spectacular coastline, Sonoma County is one of the most well-known wine regions in California. Even so, there’s always something new to explore along Sonoma’s rural roads.

J. Rickards Winery Tour
Guests enjoy the vineyard tour at J. Rickards Winery during Experience Alexander Valley June 22-23. Photo copyright 2018 J. Rickards Winery

TASTE: The region is best known for Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Zinfandel and Cabernet Sauvignon, but Sonoma’s diversity of climate and soils allows vintners to grow dozens of other varieties as well. You’ll find a more relaxed pace in the Alexander Valley where winding country roads lead to some of the county’s most delicious Cabernet Sauvignon wines, known for their restrained, elegant style. As one of Sonoma’s larger appellations in terms of vineyard acres, Alexander Valley’s back roads include more than two dozen wineries. Hidden treasures can also be found in the nearby Dry Creek Valley and Russian River Valley.

TOUR: On June 22-23, Experience Alexander Valley invites small groups of 20 or less to experience everything from blending seminars with winemakers to ravioli-making workshops to bocce in the vineyards. Also on June 8 – July 14 is the Art of Wine with a Vintage Palette at the Healdsburg Center for the Arts, featuring 60 artists celebrating the wine country culture of the North Bay. The free opening reception is June 8.

For more information on lodging, dining and upcoming events, see Sonoma County Tourism.

 

NAPA VALLEY

A small region with a deservedly large reputation, the Napa Valley is known the world over for its acclaimed wines—primarily Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay and Bordeaux varieties—and a thriving culinary scene that includes Michelin star restaurants, delicious food truck fare and every level of cuisine in between.

Calistoga Harvest Table
Guests enjoy the Calistoga Harvest Table event featuring local restaurants and 40-plus wineries.

TASTE: Bordered by two mountain ranges—the Vaca on the east and the Mayacamas on the west—the Napa Valley is rich with less-traveled mountain roads that invite visitors to meander and discover.  Spring Mountain Road, just a few minutes off busy highway 29, is a rural respite of family owned and operated wineries, along with 1,000 acres of gorgeous hillside vineyards. Likewise, Mount Veeder, Atlas Peak, Howell Mountain and Diamond Mountain reward travelers with mountain vistas and limited-production wines. (Due to their remote locations, some wineries require advance appointments.)

TOUR: Festival Napa Valley is in July, featuring SEAL, performers Patti Lupone, jazz artists the Yellow Jackets, and a full slate of the finest concerts, operas and fabulous winery parties. Free outdoor concerts will be at the St. Helena Concert Series, held on alternating Thursdays, June-August, in Lyman Park. Wind down the summer season at the Calistoga Harvest Table on Sept. 8, where local restaurants and 40-plus wineries team up to produce an epic feast laid out on 1,000 feet of tables in the center of Calistoga’s picturesque downtown.

For more information on lodging, dining and upcoming events, see Visit Napa Valley.

 

MENDOCINO COUNTY

Fifty miles north of Healdsburg lies ruggedly beautiful Mendocino County, home to towering redwoods and a foggy coast. More than 90 percent of the land is wild and undeveloped, and the region is known for its small-town vibe and relaxed hospitality.

Tasting from the barrel
Sample yet-to-be-released wines at the Barrel Tasting Weekend July 20-21 in Anderson Valley.

TASTE: Drive along Highway 128 in the Anderson Valley and find more than two dozen small wineries producing everything from crisp sparkling wines to gorgeous cool-climate Pinot Noir to aromatic whites. The region’s producers are proudly “green,” with a high percentage of wineries using sustainable, organic or Biodynamic methods.

TOUR: Celebrate Father’s Day weekend June 15-16 with A Taste of Redwood Valley, a chance to sample library wines, small-production lots and even spirits. Anderson Valley wineries host their Barrel Tasting Weekend July 20-21, featuring previews of new wines and tastes of current releases.

For more information on lodging, dining and upcoming events, see Visit Mendocino.

 

LAKE COUNTY

Bordering Napa, Sonoma and Mendocino counties, Lake County was named for the region’s many picturesque lakes. Vineyards are planted throughout the county, from the agriculturally rich valley at 1,370 feet elevation to the rocky red soil around Mt. Konocti—a dormant volcano—at elevations above 2,000 feet.

Lake County landscape
The picturesque vineyards of Lake County wine country. Photo George Rose.

TASTE: Home to more than 30 wineries, Lake County is known for its high-elevation Cabernet Sauvignon and Sauvignon Blanc wines. Mini-tours around Clear Lake include Upper Lake and Lakeport, Nice and Clearlake Oaks, Lower Lake, Middletown, and the volcanic hillsides of Red Hills.

TOUR: On June 16, the Lake County Beer, Wine & Swine Baconfest brings together dad-friendly favorites for Father’s Day.  Red, White, & Blues celebrates the best of Lake County wines on July 6 at Langtry Estate Vineyards in Middletown.

For more information on lodging, dining and upcoming events, see Lake County Wineries.

For all of the wine regions included in this series, use the discovercaliforniawines.com interactive map to search wineries by amenities such as tours, gardens and picnic areas, and view winery events around the state.

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MEDIA CONTACT:
Wine Institute Communications Department, 415/356-7525
communications@nullwineinstitute.org

California’s ‘Family-Friendly’ Wineries Welcome Kids to Wine Country

5월 13, 2019

Tasting rooms offer juice tastings, farm animal visits and more

Kids in Vineyard
Exploring the vineyards is one of the ways kids can enjoy California wine country.

SAN FRANCISCO — While some people visit California wineries for much-needed “grown-up” time in one of the world’s most beautiful wine regions, many parents prefer to travel and taste with their little ones in tow. This has increasingly become the trend, according to Wine Institute, inspiring many of the state’s wineries to offer special accommodations for kids, including grape juice tastings, play areas, visits with farm animals and outdoor games. These activities keep children happy and engaged while their parents sample the latest vintages.

The key to a successful and fun family outing in California’s wine country is to call ahead or check the producer’s website to see if kids are welcome. For reasons of liability or preference, some wineries do not allow guests under age 21. If the winery does allow minors, kids are permitted to join their parents in the winery and can often take part in winery tours.

Baby animals and Coppola Pool
Kids can view baby animals at Raymond Vineyards and swim at Francis Ford Coppola Winery.

Following is a list of family-friendly wineries throughout California:

ACORN Winery/Alegria Vineyards, Healdsburg, Sonoma County 
Legos, crayons and cornhole keep kids entertained while parents taste. Children may also explore the vineyards adjacent to the tasting room, join parents on a guided vineyard walk and taste grapes during harvest.
 
Alexander Valley Vineyards, Healdsburg, Sonoma County
Kids can join in winery and cave tours with their parents, visit the vineyards and enjoy the winery’s picnic area.
 
Alpha Omega, St. Helena, Napa Valley
The winery offers the coloring book, "Exploring the Napa Valley with Traveler Teddies," a kid-friendly guide to the Napa Valley, presented with a box of crayons. 
 
Austin Hope & Treana Tasting Cellar, Paso Robles, San Luis Obispo County
While parents enjoy a glass or a bottle outside overlooking the vineyards, children are invited to play cornhole or giant Jenga.     
 
Benziger Family Winery, Glen Ellen, Sonoma County
A 45-minute educational tram tour showcases the winery’s Biodynamic vineyards, caves and insect-friendly gardens.
 
Buena Vista Winery, Sonoma, Sonoma County
Tours led by period actors include wine caves and the Historic Wine Museum, which features an entertaining multi-media show. There’s also a picnic area and hedge maze.
 
Buttonwood Winery, Solvang, Santa Barbara County
Explore the large fruit tree orchard and picnic areas or visit the estate farm animals.

Pruning at Captain Vineyards.
Pruning at Captain Vineyards.
Captain Vineyards, Moraga, Contra Costa County
Tour the first green, sustainable, dry farmed vineyard and winery in the Lamorinda AVA, which offers a 4-H program for middle and high schools through the University of California at Davis.
 
Castello di Amorosa, Calistoga, Napa Valley
Tour a massive replica of an Italian castle, complete with a dungeon, then meet the estate peacocks and farm animals. Kids can sample grape juice and enjoy their own play area.
 
Castoro Cellars, Templeton, San Luis Obispo County
Games for kids include cornhole, giant Jenga and disc golf.
 
Cline Cellars, Sonoma, Sonoma County
The park-like grounds feature expansive lawns, ponds stocked with fish and turtles, caged exotic birds, vintage train cars and the California Missions Museum.
 
DeLoach Vineyards, Santa Rosa, Sonoma County
The winery offers educational, family-friendly tours detailing DeLoach’s history, winemaking techniques and farming practices. Families can end their tour with a picnic in the winery grove. 
 
Domaine Artefact, Escondido, San Diego County
Pack a picnic and play cornhole and giant Jenga, or visit the ranch’s resident horses, chickens, dogs and pigs.
 
Eberle Winery, Paso Robles, San Luis Obispo County
Cave tours and bocce courts keep the kids entertained.
 
Fawnridge Winery, Auburn, Placer County
Children are welcome in the Fawnridge tasting room, where they offer “juice boxes” and fawn deer statues to sit on outside.
 
Francis Ford Coppola Winery, Geyserville, Sonoma County
Coppola welcomes families with a large swimming pool, bocce ball court, children’s library, board games and more.
 
Heritage Oak Winery, Acampo, Lodi/San Joaquin County
Outdoor family fun includes picnicking, hiking down to the river, kayaking and camping.
 
Honig Vineyard & Winery, Rutherford, Napa Valley
The winery offers eco-tours of the vineyard, plus kids’ toys and books.
 
Kendall-Jackson Wine Estate, Fulton, Sonoma County
Kids can taste grape juice and tour the extensive vegetable garden, which includes a chicken coop, bat boxes and a demonstration bee hive.
 
Landmark Vineyards, Kenwood, Sonoma County
The free Horse Drawn Carriage Tour delves into farming practices and Sonoma wine history. There’s also a picnic area and expansive lawn.
 
Mauritson Wines, Healdsburg, Sonoma County
Grape juice tastings are offered during the harvest season.
 
Meyer Family Cellars, Yorkville, Mendocino County
The winery includes an outdoor children’s play area.
 
Navarro Vineyards, Philo, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County
Kids can enjoy a grape juice tasting of Pinot Noir and Gewürztraminer.
 
Pennyroyal Farm, Boonville, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County
The winery’s Farm Tour lets kids meet resident farm animals and sample grape juice.
 
Raymond Vineyards, St. Helena, Napa Valley
The outdoor Theater of Nature showcases how all of nature’s “actors”—including chickens and goats—play a crucial part in crafting quality wine, from the soil to the vineyards. 
 
Retzlaff Vineyards, Livermore, Livermore Valley
The winery has a picnic area and a lawn with big toy tractors for kids to play on.
 
Six Sigma Ranch and Winery, Lower Lake, Lake County
Meet "Topper", the winery’s pot belly pig who loves to have his ears rubbed. Select Saturdays, jump on the flat bed and help feed the livestock. Picnic or play a game of cornhole. 
 
Truett-Hurst Winery, Healdsburg, Sonoma County
Families are free to roam the working farm, which features goats, chickens and sheep.
 
Zaca Mesa Winery, Los Olivos, Santa Barbara County
Families are invited to picnic or play a game on the giant chess board.

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MEDIA CONTACT:
Wine Institute Communications Department, 415/356-7525
communications@nullwineinstitute.org

Fifth Annual California Green Medal: Sustainable Winegrowing Leadership Awards Recipients Announced

4월 2, 2019

SAN FRANCISCO — The California Green Medal recipients have been announced for the fifth annual Sustainable Winegrowing Leadership Awards. The California Green Medal recognizes the leadership of wineries and vineyards committed to sustainability and is presented by the California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance, California Association of Winegrape Growers, Wine Institute, Lodi Winegrape Commission, Napa Valley Vintners, Sonoma County Winegrowers and the Vineyard Team. Four Green Medals are presented in the following categories: Leader, Environment, Community and Business. The recipients of the Green Medal Awards will be honored at a ceremony at the California Department of Food and Agriculture in Sacramento on May 1, 2019. The event will be held in conjunction with a Legislative Reception, celebrating California Wines Down to Earth Month in April recognizing the California wine community’s commitment to sustainable winegrowing.

Recipients of the 2019 Green Medals are:

Green Medal Recipients 2019
From left to right: Jason Smith, President/CEO, Smith Family Wines (Community Award); Kurt Gollnick, Chief Operating Officer, Scheid Family Wines (Environment Award); Kellie Hoppe, Lab Technician, Domaine Carneros (Business Award); Nate Weis, Director of Winemaking, Silver Oak Cellars (Leader Award).

LEADER AWARD, given to the vineyard or winery that excels in the three “E’s” of sustainability—Environmentally Sound, Socially Equitable and Economically Viable practices.

Recipient: Silver Oak Cellars, located in Healdsburg and Oakville, California, understands that sustainability is a long-term strategy to achieve a healthy and thriving business, without compromising future generations’ ability to use and enjoy natural resources. Some innovative ways they achieve their sustainability goals include the design of the wineries for maximum efficiency through LEED certification. Their Oakville Winery was the first production winery to achieve LEED Platinum certification in 2016 and their Alexander Valley winery earned LEED Platinum certification in 2018. Most of their energy needs are met through onsite solar and 100% of their process water at the Alexander Valley winery is treated onsite and reused. Silver Oak Cellars provides rich benefits and fosters a family-focused work atmosphere. Silver Oak’s sustainability leadership is further evidenced by their integration of Living Building Challenge (LBC) standards in the design of their new Alexander Valley winery, with the goal to become the first LBC certified winery in 2019, on top of comprehensive vineyard and winery certification to Certified California Sustainable Winegrowing (CERTIFIED SUSTAINABLE) and the Napa Green Land and Winery programs.

Water tower at Silver Oak Cellars in Alexander Valley.
Water tower at Silver Oak Cellars in Alexander Valley.

ENVIRONMENT AWARD, given to the vineyard or winery that best demonstrates Environmental Stewardship through maximized environmental benefits from implementing sustainable practices.

Recipient: Scheid Family Wines, based in Salinas, California, holds sustainability as a core value. Scheid Family Wines strives for sustainability in the broadest sense of the word every day in all that they do. They installed a wind turbine that provides power to run the entire winery operation plus an additional 125 homes. Skylights were placed in the winery to provide a more pleasant work environment and reduce electricity usage. All the vineyards and the winery are Certified California Sustainable Winegrowing (CERTIFIED SUSTAINABLE). They recycle and reuse 100% of the grape pomace and wastewater generated in their winery. In the vineyard, they invest in human assisted technology to ease the physical demands of pruning, increase safety, enhance the well-being of their employees and extend their careers. Scheid Family Wines believes that being a leader in the wine industry requires a deep commitment to environmental stewardship and the well-being of their employees and local community.

Scheid Family Wines wine turbine.
Scheid Family Wines wine turbine.

COMMUNITY AWARD, given to the vineyard or winery that is a Good Neighbor & Employer using the most innovative practices that enhance relations with employees, neighbors and/or communities.

Recipient: Smith Family Wines, based in Monterey County, California, is a strong supporter of their local community and fosters a quality environment for their employees. A full spectrum of benefits is offered to all employees and they run a companywide wellness program with weekly outreach to employees and their families, including exercise, nutrition, biometric analysis, and lifestyle education. The wellness program alone reflects a $200,000 commitment to their employees. Employees are also paid to participate in education and professional associations, and there is comprehensive safety training. The company participates in both SIP Certified and Certified California Sustainable Winegrowing (CERTIFIED SUSTAINABLE), with a full-time employee dedicated to sustainability. Smith Family Wines is a leader in providing their employees a safe, socially equitable, and economically just place to work.

The Smith Family Wines team.
The Smith Family Wines team.

BUSINESS AWARD, given to the vineyard or winery that best demonstrates Smart Business through efficiencies, cost savings and innovation from implementing sustainable practices.

Recipient: Domaine Carneros, located in Napa, California, understands how sustainability leads to efficiency and cost effectiveness. The company was built on a pillar of sustainability and as part of their open book management plan, they set measurable goals every three years in the category of sustainability and visit these goals annually to ensure goals are being met. This type of management plan allows for all employees to be involved. One of the ways they realized significant cost savings is through their packaging reuse program. Since starting the program, the company has saved about $75,000 per year in packaging costs. This program also has helped divert solid was from landfills, while recognizing that reuse uses less energy and resources than recycling. Domaine Carneros’ smart business sense and commitment to sustainably is apparent in every facet of their operation, with both vineyards and the winery comprehensively certified to Certified California Sustainable Winegrowing (CERTIFIED SUSTAINABLE) and the Napa Green Land and Winery programs.

Domaine Carneros cover-cropped vineyard in winter.
Domaine Carneros cover-cropped vineyard in winter.

“The Green Medal recognizes the commitment and dedication to sustainability by California growers and vintners,” said Allison Jordan, CSWA Executive Director. “The hardest part is selecting only four recipients from the many amazing applications received from vineyards and wineries of all sizes from throughout California. The judging panel was impressed by the breadth and depth of sustainable practices being used to conserve water and energy, maintain healthy soil, protect air and water quality, preserve wildlife habitat, and enhance relations with employees and communities, all while improving the economic vitality of vineyards and wineries.”

A panel of wine and sustainability experts judged the applications for the fifth annual California Green Medal. They include: Karen Block, Ph.D., Directory of Industry Relations, UC Davis Viticulture & Enology; Stephanie Bolton, Ph.D., Sustainable Winegrowing Director, Lodi Winegrape Commission; Renata Brillinger, Executive Director, California Climate Action Network; Anna Brittain, Sustainability Consultant, Napa Valley Vintners; David Glancy, Master Sommelier, San Francisco Wine School; Allison Jordan, Executive Director, California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance; Cyril Penn, Editor in Chief, Wine Business Monthly; Kate Piontek, Vice President of Operations, Sonoma County; Mike Taylor, Director of Adult Beverages, Nugget Market Inc.; Ann Thrupp, Executive Director, Berkeley Food Institute at UC Berkeley; and Beth Vukmanic Lopez, SIP Certification Manager, The Vineyard Team.

Award sponsors are — Exclusive Media Sponsor: Wine Business Monthly; Gold Sponsor: Rivercap; Silver Sponsors: Farm Credit Alliance, G3, Marin Clean Energy and Protected Harvest; and, Bronze Sponsors: AG Unlimited and ETS Laboratories.

Visit www.greenmedal.org for more information.

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MEDIA CONTACT:
Wine Institute Communications Department, 415/356-7525
communications@nullwineinstitute.org

New Book: Wine Country Table

3월 28, 2019

With Recipes that Celebrate California’s Sustainable Harvest

Wine Country Table Book Cover

 
“Janet Fletcher, Robert Holmes, and Sara Remington have brilliantly captured the spirit of California wine country—its harvests, its flavors, its delights, and its humility. Page after page, farmers and winemakers share their stories and in doing so, they wrap us up in their profound love of the land and the delicious things the land gives us.”
— Karen MacNeil, author of The Wine Bible

SAN FRANCISCO — Wine Institute has released its new book, WINE COUNTRY TABLE: WITH RECIPES THAT CELEBRATE CALIFORNIA’S SUSTAINABLE HARVEST, published by Rizzoli New York. The book offers compelling stories and 50 recipes that showcase the diversity of the California’s wines and regions, its agricultural bounty and the seasonal spirit that continues to define the produce-driven and ethnically influenced essence of California wine country cooking. See: www.discovercaliforniawines.com/wine-country-table.

“Wine Country Table showcases the true rock stars of California’s world-renown culinary scene – all of the vintners and farmers throughout the state who grow more than 100 winegrape varieties and 400 specialty crops,” said Nancy Light, Wine Institute VP of Communications who with VP of Environmental Affairs Allison Jordan, conceived and edited the new book.

Beautifully photographed, the book offers a visual tour of 23 stunning farms and wineries where sustainable practices highlight the future of responsible farming and winegrowing embraced throughout California. Profiled wineries are: Cakebread Cellars, Cambria Estate Vineyard & Winery, Chamisal Vineyards, Concannon Vineyard, Domaine Carneros, Francis Ford Coppola Winery, Handley Cellars, Heringer Estates, Palumbo Family Vineyards, Ridge Vineyards, Scheid Vineyards, Six Sigma Winery, Tablas Creek Vineyard, The Lucas Winery and Turley Wine Cellars. Featured farms are: Couture Farms (asparagus), Enzo Olive Oil Company, Hilltop & Canyon Farms (avocados and citrus), Henderson Family Farms (pears), J. Marchini Farms (figs), Lodi Farming (cherries), Resendiz Brothers (cut flowers) and Taylor Brothers Farms (dried plums).

Written by award-winning author Janet Fletcher, the book also spotlights California’s key wine regions and winegrape varieties and its most important fruit and vegetable crops, with tips on how to select and use them. The recipes cover all bases, from breakfast (Golden State Granola), lunch (Frittata with Broccoli Rabe and Sheep Cheese), and dinner (Lamb Meatballs with Artichokes and Olives) to dessert (Almond, Orange, and Olive Oil Cake), with helpful California wine suggestions. Master the art of making Vietnamese Chicken Pho, learn the proper way to eat it, and complement it with a glass of California Riesling. For Spring Vegetable Tabbouli with Fava Beans, Radishes, and Spring Herbs, pour a Chardonnay, Pinot Gris or Pinot Grigio. Stir-fried Skirt Steak with Chinese Broccoli and Shiitake pairs well with both Cabernet Sauvignon and dry rosé. Taste Mexico’s influence on the California kitchen in dishes like Roasted Tomato Soup with Tortilla Crisps, ideal with Zinfandel or Sauvignon Blanc.

About the Author: Janet Fletcher is the author or co-author of nearly 30 books on food and beverage, including Cheese & Wine; Cheese & Beer; Yogurt: Sweet and Savory Recipes for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner; and Eating Local: Recipes Inspired by America’s Farmers. Fletcher’s journalism has received three James Beard Awards.

Wine Country Table: With Recipes that Celebrate California’s Sustainable Harvest by Janet Fletcher, photographs by Robert Holmes and Sara Remington, in collaboration with Wine Institute. Hardcover / 8.4” x 10.5” / 352 pages / 300 color photographs / $45.00 U.S., $60.00 Canadian / ISBN: 978-0-8478-6543-7 / Release Date: April 2019 / www.rizzoliusa.com / www.discovercaliforniawines.com/wine-country-table.

Book Credits: © Wine Country Table: With Recipes that Celebrate California’s Sustainable Harvest by Wine Institute, Rizzoli, 2019. All Wine Country Table images credit © Wine Institute by Robert Holmes and/or © Sara Remington. Certified sustainable producer Jordan Winery has consented to Wine Institute’s use of the title “Wine Country Table” for this book. Find food, wine, entertaining and travel tips at Jordan Winery’s site www.winecountrytable.com. No images or text may be reproduced in any way, published or transmitted digitally without written permission from the publisher.

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MEDIA CONTACT:
Wine Institute Communications Department, 415/356-7525
communications@nullwineinstitute.org

California Wines “Down To Earth Month” Kicks Off in April with Eco-Friendly Events Across the State

3월 19, 2019

SAN FRANCISCO — The eighth annual California Wines Down to Earth Month kicks off in April with sustainability-focused wine events and offers across the state, including Earth Day festivals, vineyard hikes, food and wine events, eco-tours and more. Created by Wine Institute, the association of nearly 1,000 California wineries, the month-long celebration highlights the winemaking community’s commitment to protecting the environment, being a good neighbor and producing high quality wines with sustainable farming and business practices. See: www.discovercaliforniawines.com/d2e.

Down to Earth Winery Events
The Taste of Mendocino is at Fort Mason Center in San Francisco April 27, and Handley Cellars (left) will be one of 30-plus wineries pouring wines, including many that are sustainable, organic or biodynamic. April 20 is Santa Cruz Mountains Passport Day with 40-plus participating wineries, many with “green” certifications. Ridge Vineyards (right) is celebrating that day with a special flight of organic wines.

Coinciding with this year’s Down to Earth Month is the release of “Wine Country Table, With Recipes that Celebrate California’s Sustainable Harvest,” a book showcasing California’s rich sustainable bounty and the winegrowers and other farmers across the state who are helping to set the standard for innovation and responsible farming, along with 50 recipes and tips on food and wine. Acclaimed food writer, Janet Fletcher, is the author.

California is a global leader in sustainable winegrowing based on vineyard acreage and winery case production following these practices. As of 2018, 70% (209 million cases) of California’s total wine production and 25% of statewide wine acreage (150,000 acres) are CERTIFIED SUSTAINABLE.

To celebrate California sustainable winegrowing, 40 Down to Earth Month events are happening in April at wineries statewide including the region-wide events listed below. New events are being added daily to the downloadable list here:

11th Annual Wine 4 Paws Weekend, April 5-7, Paso Robles: Visit San Luis Obispo County wineries and stock up on fine wines during this benefit weekend to help homeless cats and dogs. Nearly 100 wineries and other participating businesses will share their proceeds with the pets of the Woods Humane Society.

Drink Green: A Toast to Sustainable Winegrowing, April 6, Madera County: Participating wineries of the Madera Wine Trail will celebrate the region’s sustainable winegrowing and winemaking practices by offering special tastings and education about eco-conscious winery practices.

El Dorado Passport Wine Adventure, April 6-7, Placerville: Pick up your passport for access to more than 20 participating wineries in El Dorado County in the Sierra Foothills, including many committed to sustainable growing and winemaking practices.

Santa Cruz Mountains Passport Celebration Day, April 20: Join more than 40 participating Santa Cruz Mountains wineries—many of them pouring sustainable and organic wines—for a day of tasting throughout the region.

Stags Leap District Wineries: Vineyard to Vintner, April 26-28, Napa Valley: Celebrating 30 years as an American Viticultural Area, the Stags Leap District Vineyard to Vintner anniversary celebration includes dinners, seminars on terroir and winegrowing, and tastings that include coveted library wines and new releases. A portion of the proceeds benefit a scholarship fund.

Taste of Mendocino, April 27, San Francisco: Head to Fort Mason Center in San Francisco to sample wines from more than 30 Mendocino County producers—known for their high rate of participation in certifications for sustainable, organic, biodynamic and fish-friendly farming practices—along with artisanal food bites.

Passport to Dry Creek Valley- 30th Anniversary, April 27-28, Healdsburg: Join more than 40 Dry Creek Valley wineries for tastings, food and wine pairings, fine cuisine from acclaimed Sonoma County chefs, and educational tours that highlight sustainable operations in the vineyards.

Earth Day Napa, April 28, Napa Valley: Come to Oxbow Commons and celebrate Earth Day with the Environmental Education Coalition of Napa County. The event features music, activities for all ages, delicious local food, wine and beer. More than 75 organizations and vendors will provide information about green products, services, the local environment, and how to make a difference for the good of the planet.

View all 2019 Down to Earth events, tours and offers in California Wine Country at: www.discovercaliforniawines.com/d2e.

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Established in 1934, Wine Institute is the public policy advocacy group of nearly 1,000 California wineries and affiliated businesses that initiates and advocates state, federal and international public policy to enhance the environment for the responsible production, consumption and enjoyment of wine. California wineries generate $114 billion annually in economic activity to the U.S. economy and create 786,000 jobs across the country of which 325,000 are in California. The organization also works to enhance the economic and environmental health of the state through its leadership in sustainable winegrowing and a partnership with Visit California to showcase California’s wine and food offerings and the state as a top travel destination.

The California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance (CSWA), a 501(c)(3) educational nonprofit organization established by Wine Institute and the California Association of Winegrape Growers, received the governor’s top environmental award for increasing adoption of sustainable winegrowing practices in California and for initiating new educational tools and program improvements. Learn more at: www.discovercaliforniawines.com/sustainable-winegrowing.

CERTIFIED SUSTAINABLE wine bottle logo

Wineries and vineyards around the state have also earned Certified California Sustainable Winegrowing status through the third-party certification program launched by CSWA. Certified California Sustainable Winegrowing and other programs such as the Bay Area Green Business Program, Fish Friendly Farming, Lodi Rules, Napa Green and Sustainability in Practice (SIP) play a vital role in the California wine community’s successful efforts to produce high quality wine that is environmentally sound, economically feasible and socially responsible.

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MEDIA CONTACT:
Wine Institute Communications Department, 415/356-7525
communications@nullwineinstitute.org

Editors: download all the Down to Earth Month winery events by region here and photos of winery events and California sustainable winegrowing here.

New Wine Institute Video Series Spotlights “California Wines: UNRESERVED”

3월 5, 2019

View the video at: www.facebook.com/CaliforniaWines

In One Glass Video
Grapes Vine Hand Toasting on the Coast

SAN FRANCISCO — Sipping sparkling wine beneath towering redwood trees; shucking oysters just pulled from the Tomales Bay; contemplating ocean waves while sampling wines uniquely shaped by sunshine, wind and fog. This could only be California.

Wine Institute’s new video series, “California Wines: UNRESERVED,” highlights some of the state’s most iconic landscapes as young sommeliers, wine directors and educators explore the role of the senses in enjoying wine, the meaning of terroir, the magic of California’s old vines, and the ways in which food and wine enhance each other. The videos emphasize the approachability of California wine and the many ways that it fits into relaxed, informal settings.

“In One Glass,” the first in the 50-part video series, delves into the diversity of flavors found in California wines, as described by wine writer Elaine Chukan Brown. It debuts Tuesday, March 5 on Wine Institute’s U.S. Facebook page before rolling out across global social media channels including Instagram, Twitter and YouTube, and going live on www.DiscoverCaliforniaWines.com. Two new videos will be posted every week through September.

WATCH THE VIDEOS AT:
Facebook Instagram Twitter YouTube Website

Wine Institute is the public policy advocacy group for California wineries which produce 80 percent of U.S. wine and account for more than 90 percent of U.S. wine exports. California is home to dozens of distinct wine regions, 139 American Viticultural Areas and 4,800 wineries. As the nation’s number one state for wine and food tourism, California attracts 24 million visitors to its wine regions each year.

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MEDIA CONTACT:
Wine Institute Communications Department, 415/356-7525
communications@nullwineinstitute.org

Millennial Vintners to Watch in 2019

2월 28, 2019

Young California Vintners Inspire Millennial Generation

 
SAN FRANCISCO — In 2019, millennials, ages 23-38, will number 73 million people, surpassing Baby Boomers to become America’s largest generation. These consumers, distinguished by their openness to trying new and unusual wines, are naturally of great interest to California wineries. Because millennials are known to value the advice of their peers, what better place to look for opinions and wine recommendations than their own generation of vintners?

With millennials playing a role in U.S. wine sales, Wine Institute has identified several inventive young vintners who are taking the reins of their families’ multi-generational wineries. The following “Millennial Vintners to Watch for 2019” are just a handful of the many leaders bringing new ideas and innovations to their family businesses to help them thrive long into the future.
 

Jacqueline Balletto – Balletto Vineyards, Sonoma County
 
As Balletto’s tasting room and direct-to-consumer sales manager, this third-generation vintner has made the family business more digitally savvy by upgrading the winery’s tasting room technology, creating a mobile-friendly website and connecting with consumers via social media. In the tasting room, Jacqueline also carries out the family’s vision of building lifelong relationships with customers by introducing people to their estate Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. Prior to her current role, she was a viticulture assistant for the winery and helped maintain relationships with wineries that purchase fruit from Balletto’s Russian River Valley vineyards.

Jamie Benziger – Imagery Estate Winery, Sonoma County
 
Jamie is the daughter of Imagery founder Joe Benziger. As winemaker, she is the artist behind the winery in Glen Ellen. In addition to annually crafting more than 35 wines, she launched a new tier in 2017 designed to broaden consumers’ palates with unique varietal blends. (For example, the Sauvignon Blanc is blended with 20% Muscat and the Pinot Noir contains 10% Petit Verdot.) Jamie’s collection is introducing Imagery to a new generation and includes the first wines Imagery has ever distributed outside the tasting room.

Nicholas Bleecher – Jericho Canyon Vineyards, Napa Valley
 
The son of founders Dale and Marla Bleecher, Nicholas is the winemaker and general manager at Jericho Canyon Vineyard. He grew up spending years working in the vineyards after school and during summers and later on in the winery when the building was completed in 2006. Earning UC Davis degrees in viticulture and enology and managerial economics, he worked abroad as many young winemakers do. He returned to Jericho in 2011, working alongside winemakers Heidi Barrett, Bo Barrett, Thomas Brown, Aaron Pott and Michel Rolland. Today, he makes Jericho Canyon Vineyard’s wines as well as wines for personal clients.

Sarah Cahn Bennett – Navarro Vineyards, Mendocino County
 
Sarah is the daughter of founders Ted Bennett and Deborah Cahn, leading the family’s vision for the next generation. When she first took over running the family winery with her brother, Aaron, Sarah reintroduced sheep to the estate (it was formerly a sheep ranch) and put the animals to work suckering vines. She also brought more scientific rigor to the business using her UC Davis training. With the development of Pennyroyal Farm, Navarro’s sister wine estate in Boonville, Sarah created a unique program with excellent wines, acclaimed artisan cheeses and a dairy farm.

Bryan Cass – Cass Vineyard and Winery, Paso Robles
 
Bryan’s start in the wine business began in high school, shortly after his family purchased the property on which Cass Winery and Vineyards now stands. The summer before his junior year of high school, he and his friends worked away the days repairing fences, clearing out debris, and avoiding rattlesnakes on the property. After graduating from Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo with a degree in wine and viticulture, Bryan went on to earn a master’s degree in wine business from the University of Adelaide in Australia. After graduation in 2007, he returned to Cass to apply his skills and knowledge to the family business. Today, as the winery’s general manager, he handles everything from payroll and administrative management, to sales, to working in the tasting room.

Megan Cline – Cline Cellars & Jacuzzi Family Vineyards, Sonoma County
 
Megan is the daughter of Fred and Nancy Cline and has worked with her family for the past four years learning every part of the business from winemaking and marketing to sales and hospitality. She’s been working with Cline’s associate winemaker experimenting with a range of varietals made in amphorae. Megan believes there is a purity in flavor and texture in these wines because the amphorae do not overshadow the grapes. Megan is also a Certified Sommelier through the Court of Master Sommeliers.

Diana Eakle Hawkins & David Eakle – Pope Valley Vineyards, Napa Valley
 
Diana and David have been managing the operations of their family winery since 2012. David is the “boots on the ground” vineyard and winemaking director while Diana manages the sales, marketing and everything in between. They both graduated from CSU Chico with a B.S. in Agricultural Business. David’s concentration was on crop science while Diana focused on marketing & business. They recently became equal partners with their father Sam Eakle to carry on their family legacy. They produce Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Sauvignon Blanc, Sangiovese and Zinfandel from their estate vineyards that they played and worked in since they were young. As proprietors of a pre-prohibition winery, David and Diana have maintained the rich history and original historic winery and cave that have been on the property since it was established in 1897.

Chris Hall – Long Meadow Ranch Wine Estates, Napa Valley/Mendocino
 
Chris is the winery’s COO and executive vice president and he and his parents, Ted and Laddie Hall, run Long Meadow Ranch which includes cultivating over 2,000 acres of land that produce estate-grown grapes and wine, olives and olive oil, fruits and vegetables, eggs and grass-fed lamb and beef. They pioneered the Full Circle Farming concept, an organic, sustainable, integrated farming system that contributes to the health of the full operation. Besides managing the winery’s diversified farming activities, Chris drove the development of Farmstead, a food and wine destination that includes a restaurant, general store, tasting room and outdoor café.

Lindsay Hoopes – Hoopes Vineyards, Napa Valley
 
The daughter of winery founder Spencer Hoopes, Lindsay is the winery owner and general manager. She joined the winery in 2013 after a law career in the San Francisco district attorney’s office. Under the leadership of her father, she expanded the winery’s portfolio of wines, focusing on limited-production Cabernet Sauvignon of the Napa Valley. She bought and developed a new winery at the former Hopper Creek Winery in Yountville and sources grapes from there and the flagship property in Oakville. She is continuing the goal of capturing the truest expression of the terroir and grape and is dedicated to organic and sustainable farming.

Katie Jackson – Jackson Family Wines, Sonoma County
 
The daughter of Barbara Banke and Jess Jackson, Katie is the winery’s Senior VP of Corporate Responsibility. She has championed innovative water and energy management, sustainable farming practices, greenhouse gas reduction and enhanced social equity initiatives in the company since 2011. Under her leadership, Jackson Family Wines has continued efforts to cut water usage by 34% since 2008, and JFW is now the Sonoma County wine industry’s largest solar generator. In 2016, Katie launched the company’s first Family Responsibility Report with comprehensive five-year goals outlining its commitment to reduce its environmental footprint and drive social equity. With Famlia Torres, she formed a working group called the International Wineries for Climate Action to reduce the carbon footprint across the global wine industry.

Kevin Jones – Lava Cap Winery, El Dorado County/Sierra Foothills
 
Kevin is the marketing director and assistant operations manager at Lava Cap winery in Placerville, Sierra Foothills. In response to consumer interest in more immersive winery experiences, Kevin is striving to create an atmosphere that inspires guests to relax and stay a while. He also expanded the wine club to make it customizable to members’ preferences and introduced a “modern country club” concept in which visitors can bring their friends along and feel like they’re part of the brand. While others focus on digital marketing, he emphasizes real-life connections by ensuring that family members are present at all public tasting events.

Elizabeth Neuman & Will Phelps – Joseph Phelps Vineyards, Napa Valley
 
The grandchildren of winery founder Joe Phelps, Elizabeth and Will both knew they wanted to pursue a career in the wine business, joining the winery in 2011 and 2012 respectively. Elizabeth is director of business development and marketing in charge of evaluating the winery’s business from a large-scale perspective and identifying areas of opportunity in marketing, production and operations. She also oversees Joseph Phelps’ brand management and communication of the winery’s strategic vision. Will has worked at the winery as a California sales representative and its marketing director and was promoted in 2017 to director of hospitality and consumer sales, overseeing Phelps’ direct-to-consumer business.

Reid & Sophie Patterson – Mount Eden Vineyards, Santa Cruz Mountains
 
They are the son and daughter of Jeffrey and Ellie Patterson. As their parents ease out of full-time work, Reid is taking over the winery production side of the business and Sophie is handling the marketing, tasting room and sales aspects. They are both owners of the winery and are passionate about continuing the family legacy producing small lots of Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon from their mountaintop estate vineyards as well as non-estate Chardonnays from the Central Coast, primarily Edna Valley.

Jamie & Emily Peterson – Peterson Winery, Sonoma County
 
As son and daughter of founder Fred Peterson, this brother-sister team manages much of the day-to-day operations of their father’s Dry Creek Valley winery. Winemaker/General Manager Jamie stays true to his father’s traditional winemaking values while weaving in innovative ideas and techniques. Introducing bag-in-box wines to attract more millennial buyers is just one of Jamie’s successes. As the direct-to-consumer and trade Marketing Manager, Emily brings a fresh perspective to the sales efforts by embracing social media and other technologies to connect with wine buyers. Whether on the road, in their intimate tasting room, or during events, Emily’s goal is to engage with like-minded wine drinkers as they sip and fall in love with Peterson wines.

Scott Saunders – Hearst Ranch Winery, Paso Robles
 
The son of winery owners Jim and Debbie Saunders, Scott entered the wine industry in the summer of 2011 after a job in construction. With an appreciation for crisp white wines and balanced reds, he then joined his dad at the winery. Fast forward several vintages, and Scott has gone “all in” at Hearst Ranch, diving into the marketing and sales side of the business. Bringing creative energy and a passion for sales, Scott’s mission is to share with trade customers the thought and effort his family puts into each wine. He also has a hand in the winemaking side of the business and is currently contemplating a carbonic fermented Petite Sirah for the next harvest.

Peter Stolpman – Stolpman Vineyards, Santa Barbara County
 
In 2009, Peter took over day-to-day management of the winery founded by his father, and he is now the company’s managing partner. One of his proudest innovations is the Fresh Wine program, which focuses on wines that buck the “jammy and high-octane” trend with such offerings as carbonic Sangiovese. The wines have been so successful that Stolpman is considering making Fresh Wine a separate brand. Under Pete’s leadership the winery has also planted more than 150,000 own-rooted vines, because he believes they produce more nuanced fruit. He’s also having fun with obscure grape varieties such as Trousseau, Savagnin, Mondeuse and Poulsard.

Anthony Terlato II – Terlato International
 
Fourth generation Anthony Terlato II joined Terlato Wines two years ago and has made significant contributions as region manager of the Midwest market. His experience includes successful sales and management roles at Empire Merchants and Southern Wine & Spirits. As a young adult, Tony completed multiple internships at Sanford, Chimney Rock and Rutherford Hill wineries in California. He has studied both the production and retail aspects of winemaking. Tony brings the same entrepreneurial passion to his family’s business that his father, grandfather and great-grandfathers did before him.

Hailey Trefethen – Trefethen Family Vineyards, Napa Valley
 
The daughter of John and Janet Trefethen, Hailey and her brother, Loren, are taking the reins of the family winery. Along with managing the winery’s participation in the Napa Green and California CERTIFIED SUSTAINABLE Winegrowing programs, she is actively involved in the winery’s vineyard and winemaking decisions. Hailey recently spearheaded the 2.5-year restoration of Trefethen’s 1886 winery building, which was severely damaged in Napa’s 2014 earthquake.

Luke Udsen – Castoro Cellars, Paso Robles
 
As the son of owners Niels and Bimmer Udsen, Luke has worked, in some capacity, for the winery since the age of 13. He started out in the vineyards with jobs such as pruning and picking and spent summers in the winery cellar throughout high school and college. He found his calling working in sales, marketing and social media, and today he spends most of his time traveling around the state to promote his family’s wines, pouring at events and building relationships. Luke also manages Castoro’s Facebook and Twitter accounts, and pours his love of writing into the winery’s weekly blog, providing insights into the happenings at the winery, on the road and in the tasting room.

Alan Viader – Viader Vineyards, Napa Valley
 
Alan is the son of Delia Viader, who founded the winery in 1986. Since 2002, he has acted as both vineyard manager and winemaker of the Howell Mountain estate. Alan has spent the past seven years working to install and perfect a sophisticated combination of sap-flow sensors, weather station, and other cutting-edge technologies that provide invaluable information about the vineyards’ soil, vines, canopy, fruit and more. This lets him farm at a granular level, unavailable to previous generations of vintners. As a result, the winery has reduced water use by 50 percent.

Niki & Jordan Wente – Wente Vineyards, Livermore Valley
 
Both are the daughters of fifth generation winegrower, Phil Wente. Niki joined the family business in 2017 and is now the winery’s viticulture supervisor, in charge of buying and selling grapes and managing winegrower relations. Vineyard sustainability is important to Niki, and under her guidance, the winery has added more owl boxes in the vineyards and implemented the compost of lees solids and re-application to the soil. Jordan is Wente’s procurement project manager. She joined the business in 2015 and was instrumental in the recent winery and branding renovation of Murrieta’s Well. In her current role, she supports custom and private label projects.

 

Established in 1934, Wine Institute is the public policy advocacy group of nearly 1,000 California wineries and affiliated businesses that works to enhance the environment to responsibly produce, promote and enjoy wine. Wine Institute also supports the economic and environmental health of its communities through its leadership in sustainable winegrowing and a partnership with Visit California to showcase California’s wine and food offerings and the state as a top travel destination. Wine Institute’s membership represents 80 percent of U.S. wine production and over 90 percent of U.S. wine exports.

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Note to editors: Images of vintners here.

Wine Institute member millennial vintners working at their multi-generational family winery can be added to this listing by contacting: communications@nullwineinstitute.org. Submissions should include a photo, bio and information describing the vintner’s focus of work. Vintners must be in age range of 23-38 as of 2019.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Wine Institute Communications Department, 415/356-7525
communications@nullwineinstitute.org

Sommeliers Offer California Wine and Food Pairing Tips During Restaurant Month

1월 14, 2019

Discover New Varietals and Regions on Wine Lists Around the State

California Wine Summit 2017

SAN FRANCISCO — January is California Restaurant Month, when participating eateries across the state offer special menus and fabulous great-value meals that showcase the Golden State’s incredible cuisine and culinary talent. California is the nation’s top agricultural state producing more than 100 winegrape varieties and 400 crops, so it’s also a great time to celebrate California’s vinous bounty on restaurant wine lists and fresh farm-to-fork meals. Along with the classics, California vintners are producing wines in an increasingly diverse range of varietals and styles—offering diners much to explore while they discover new restaurants.

To guide diners in discovering new wines during California Restaurant Month, Wine Institute asked three renowned California sommeliers—Tonya Pitts of One Market Restaurant in San Francisco; Wendy Shoemaker, most recently with Californios in San Francisco; and Jim Rollston of Manresa in Los Gatos—to share their insights about trends, wines they’re most excited about, and how to pair California wines with local cuisine.

From left to right: Wendy Shoemaker, Jim Rollston and Tonya Pitts
From left to right: Wendy Shoemaker, Jim Rollston and Tonya Pitts. (Alana Hale photo of Jim Rollston)

What trends are you seeing now with California wines? 

Wendy Shoemaker, Californios: California wines are becoming even more food friendly and we’re seeing more single-vineyard designations on the labels. We are also seeing a trend toward varietals commonly found in other places, like Tempranillo, Albariño, Sangiovese and Trousseau.

Jim Rollston, Manresa: The main trend continuing right now that has been percolating for several years is a new look at unconventional varietals and blends. The number of non-mainstream varietal wines from California has been steadily increasing, and the quality is higher than ever.

Which California wine regions are you into right now?   

Wendy Shoemaker, Californios: The “limestone belt” running through San Benito/Monterey counties in American Viticultural Areas such as the Cienega Valley, Lime Kiln Valley, Mt. Harlan and Chalone.

Tonya Pitts, One Market: I’m excited about aromatic white wine varietals grown in Santa Barbara County. There are some great examples of old vine Chenin Blanc and Grüner Veltliner being grown in the region, and they are truly versatile with an array of dishes.

Jim Rollston, Manresa: Amongst established American Viticultural Areas, I am most excited about the Santa Cruz Mountains. The quality of classic varietals like Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, for me, stand alongside California’s greatest examples of those wines.

What kinds of dishes would you pair with some of California’s more traditional varietals?  

Wendy Shoemaker, Californios: This sounds a bit crazy, but one of my favorites is Merlot and Indian food. The velvetiness of the wine is great with the curry spices! Another is Sta. Rita Hills Pinot Noir with duck and molé sauce.

Tonya Pitts, One Market: There are two dishes at One Market that pair really well with Sonoma Coast Chardonnay. The first is seared snapper with butter beans, escarole and lobster sauce. The wine complements all the elements of the dish without upstaging it—it becomes part of the dish. The other pairing is mushroom and sunchoke risotto with green apples, parmesan and cider reduction. The wine has a fair amount of mineral character on the palate, and the sunchoke, parmesan and cider reduction bring out more fruit in the Chardonnay.

Jim Rollston, Manresa: One of the best wine pairings I tasted this year was with a California Sauvignon Blanc. It was matched with a citrus-heavy dish that also included daikon, Imperial miso and komatsuna (Japanese mustard spinach), and the intensity of flavor from the wine was perfect. When it comes to Cabernet Sauvignon, I’m old school; I like to pair it with beef!

In general, what influence do sauces, spices and preparation have on wine affinity? 

Wendy Shoemaker, Californios: They have a huge effect—especially how a dish is cooked. Working with Mexican-inspired cuisine at Californios really helped me think outside the box with pairings, and I’ve found that California Zinfandel with juicy, dark fruit can be the perfect match for food with a bit of spiciness.

Tonya Pitts, One Market: My pairings are based on the protein, but the sauce and spices play a big role in the outcome of the pairing. I look for similar profiles in the wine and the dish, and highlight those similarities.

California Restaurant Month celebrations will take place at various times throughout the month of January, lasting from one week to 10 days. To find dates for participating cities and regions across California, visit www.visitcalifornia.com/california-restaurant-month

Established in 1934, Wine Institute is the public policy advocacy group of nearly 1,000 California wineries and affiliated businesses that works to enhance the environment to responsibly produce, promote and enjoy wine. Wine Institute also supports the economic and environmental health of its communities through its leadership in sustainable winegrowing and a partnership with Visit California to showcase California’s wine and food offerings and the state as a top travel destination.  Wine Institute’s membership represents 80 percent of U.S. wine production and over 90 percent of U.S. wine exports. For information visit www.wineinstitute.org or its consumer website at: www.discovercaliforniawines.com.

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MEDIA CONTACT:
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Wine Institute Donates Archive to UC Davis

1월 7, 2019
The poster
The poster “California: Wine Land of America,” by Mexican-American artist Amado Gonzalez, depicts California wine regions and was part of a series used to promote California wines, circa 1965.

Airline menus boasting California wines, vineyard growing histories and even a movie screenplay set during Prohibition are among the latest additions to the wine collections of the library at the University of California, Davis.

Wine Institute, the leading association for the California wine industry, has donated its organizational archive and book collection to UC Davis. They complement the extensive wine collections already at the university and will help researchers understand how California wineries recovered from Prohibition and rose to the level of international prominence it enjoys today.

“We’re delighted to see our materials become part of the university’s rich collection on California wine and to make them broadly available to scholars, researchers, writers and wineries,” said Robert P. ‘Bobby’ Koch, president and CEO of the institute.

The three most significant organizational archives covering the rise of California wine since Prohibition are those from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, the UC Davis Department of Viticulture and Enology, and Wine Institute,” said Axel Borg, the library’s wine subject specialist. “We had the government papers and the scientific research. Now we have the leading industry voice represented as well.”

Read the full press release: https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/wine-institute-donates-archive-uc-davis

Wine Institute Launches Mobile Version of DiscoverCaliforniaWines.com

12월 7, 2018

Consumer/Trade/Media Website for U.S. and International Audiences Gets Major Upgrade

Discover California Wines Website on Mobile, Tablet and Desktop

SAN FRANCISCO — Wine Institute has relaunched its DiscoverCaliforniaWines.com consumer website as a comprehensive resource on California wines, wineries and planning a tour to California wine country. The website is available for the U.S. and customized for top export markets in nine localized and foreign language versions.

The website has been updated for mobile and tablet viewers, and users can view new state-of-the-art wine region maps that display wineries, events and American Viticultural Areas (AVAs) in an interactive manner similar to Google maps. Map content is dynamic so that visitors can see winery locations within AVA boundaries and view details about events, winery profiles and amenities. Popular existing content such as the winery directory, recipes and region and varietal information remains with updated formats.

DiscoverCaliforniaWines.com is the ultimate source for information on California AVAs, wineries and events, presented in an easy-to-navigate, visually appealing way for our global audience,” said Linsey Gallagher, Vice President of International Marketing for Wine Institute.

“Website visitors have easy access to the information they want most,” said Nancy Light, Vice President of Wine Institute Communications. “In addition to touring maps, there is a collection of delicious recipes with wine pairings and guides to California regions, varietals and sustainable winegrowing practices.”

As before, DiscoverCaliforniaWines.com has been translated and localized for international users in nine countries in addition to the U.S. These international websites support Wine Institute’s California Wine Export Program, which has 175 winery participants that export to 135 countries.

Discover California Wines by key regions Discover California Wines in Russian River Valley
From California’s major wine regions, users can select a specific AVA, such as the Russian River Valley, and zoom in more to see wineries and events.
Shrimp Tacos Grilled Steak Noodles
Dozens of recipes, paired with California wine suggestions, highlight the diverse and delicious wine and food offerings of the Golden State.

Established in 1934, Wine Institute is the public policy advocacy group of 1,000 California wineries and wine-related businesses that initiate and advocate public policy to enhance the environment for the responsible production, consumption and enjoyment of wine. The organization contributes to the economic and environmental vitality of California and the U.S. through leadership in sustainable winegrowing, an international marketing program that promotes awareness of and appreciation for California wines throughout the world, and a partnership with Visit California to showcase the state’s diverse and abundant wine and food offerings. Wine Institute membership represents 81 percent of U.S. wine production and more than 90 percent of U.S. wine exports.

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MEDIA CONTACT:
Wine Institute Communications Department, 415/356-7525
communications@nullwineinstitute.org

Fifty Masters of Wine Tour California Regions & Wines: A Photo Review

11월 12, 2018

Fifty Masters of Wine in front of the Golden Gate Bridge

SAN FRANCISCO — Fifty Masters of Wine (MWs) from 16 countries participated in a once-in-a-lifetime tour of California wines in late October which showcased 600 wines from 60 American Viticultural Areas (AVAs) throughout the state and 300 vintners. Touring California wine regions for 10 days through the Central Coast and North Coast areas, and tasting wines from across the state, the highly regarded group included sommeliers, wine retailers, restaurateurs, wine writers and other leaders in the global hospitality industry. The event, the Masters of Wine “California Dreamin’ Tour,” was a collaboration between Wine Institute and the London-based Institute of Masters of Wine.

See the full program at www.californiadreamintour.com and list of MW guests at www.californiadreamintour.com/participants.

“We were so thrilled to have these MWs join our landmark event and meet many of the best ambassadors from the Golden State wine world,” said Linsey Gallagher, Wine Institute Vice President of International Marketing. “These wine industry influencers are key to enhancing consumer and trade perceptions of our wines and expanding export sales. U.S. wine exports, more than 90% from California, reached $1.53 billion in winery revenues in 2017, and have grown nearly 70% by value in the past decade.”

Photos of the Masters of Wine tour can be downloaded here. Below are some highlights.

CDFA Secretary of Agriculture Karen Ross helped officially open the program, and spoke about California’s work on climate change, water and land conservation The MWs attended a tasting of Rhône-style wines from Santa Barbara County at Stolpman Vineyards in the Ballard Canyon AVA
CDFA Secretary of Agriculture Karen Ross helped officially open the program, and spoke about California’s work on climate change, water and land conservation. (Elaine Chukan Brown photo)
The MWs attended a tasting of Rhône-style wines from Santa Barbara County at Stolpman Vineyards in the Ballard Canyon AVA. (Alycia Moreno photo)
Bien Nacido vintner Nicholas Miller (right) and winemaker Trey Fletcher presented wines from Santa Maria Valley, Santa Barbara Vintner Jason Haas led a tour of Tablas Creek Vineyard, followed by a Rhône component tasting with Paso Robles winemakers
Bien Nacido vintner Nicholas Miller (right) and winemaker Trey Fletcher presented wines from Santa Maria Valley, Santa Barbara. (Alycia Moreno photo)
Vintner Jason Haas led a tour of Tablas Creek Vineyard, followed by a Rhône component tasting with Paso Robles winemakers. (Elaine Chukan Brown photo)
A panel of Paso Robles vintners explored the role of phenolics in the winemaking process at a tasting of the region’s wines at Daou Vineyards Vintner Paul Draper discussed the Santa Cruz Mountains AVA and wines during a Monte Bello Winery tour, followed by a 53-year retrospective of Ridge wines and dinner
A panel of Paso Robles vintners explored the role of phenolics in the winemaking process at a tasting of the region’s wines at Daou Vineyards.
Vintner Paul Draper discussed the Santa Cruz Mountains AVA and wines during a Monte Bello Winery tour, followed by a 53-year retrospective of Ridge wines and dinner. (Alycia Moreno photo)
A tasting with 20 Sonoma County wineries was held at Francis Ford Coppola Winery in Geyserville The history of California Chardonnays was presented by writer Elaine Chukan Brown at La Crema Winery, Healdsburg, followed by a lunch with wines from the North Coast and Central Coast
A tasting with 20 Sonoma County wineries was held at Francis Ford Coppola Winery in Geyserville. (Alycia Moreno photo)
The history of California Chardonnays was presented by writer Elaine Chukan Brown at La Crema Winery, Healdsburg, followed by a lunch with wines from the North Coast and Central Coast. (Alycia Moreno photo)
At Timber Cove Lodge on the Sonoma Coast, the MW group experienced a truly blind tasting of wines from across the state, led by Hoby Wedler, PhD Timber Cove was also the venue for tastings of California’s cool-climate wines, including Pinot Noir and sparking wine
At Timber Cove Lodge on the Sonoma Coast, the MW group experienced a truly blind tasting of wines from across the state, led by Hoby Wedler, PhD.
Timber Cove was also the venue for tastings of California’s cool-climate wines, including Pinot Noir and sparking wine. (Alycia Moreno photo)
At Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars, a panel of consulting winemakers shared their experiences in Napa Valley and beyond MW guests enjoyed a food truck dinner and tasting of 100-plus Napa Valley wines with 50 vintners at Robert Mondavi Winery
At Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars, a panel of consulting winemakers shared their experiences in Napa Valley and beyond.
MW guests enjoyed a food truck dinner and tasting of 100-plus Napa Valley wines with 50 vintners at Robert Mondavi Winery. (Alycia Moreno photo)
MOW group photo
An enthusiastic MW group raise a glass to California Wines. (Alycia Montero photo)

COMMENTS FROM MW PARTICIPANTS

“I hope you are confident that you will have boosted the international reputation of California wine to a serious degree.” – John Hoskins MW, M.D. Huntsbridge Ltd., UK

“I will certainly be listing more Californian wines once the new business is up and running as there were many that were delicious and that I felt would suit my clients.” – Victoria Stephens-Clarkson, MW, VSC Wine and Drink Ltd., UK

“I believe this has opened up many eyes as to the unique and delicious aspects of California wine. Hopefully there will be much writing about and purchasing of CA wines as a result of this trip.” – Dr. Liz Thach, MW, professor, Sonoma State University, & wine journalist

ABOUT WINE INSTITUTE

Established in 1934, Wine Institute is the public policy advocacy group of more than 1,000 California wineries and affiliated businesses that initiates and advocates state, federal and international public policy to enhance the environment for the responsible production, consumption and enjoyment of wine. Wine Institute’s California Wine Export Program has more than 175-member wineries exporting to 138 countries. The program’s 15 representative offices conduct activities in 25 countries.

ABOUT INSTITUTE OF MASTERS OF WINE

The Institute of Masters of Wine is a professional education and examination organization based in the United Kingdom that awards the Master of Wine (MW) title to those who pass the MW examination. The MW qualification is regarded as one of the highest standards of professional knowledge in the world of wine. The 380 MWs are working in 30 countries across five continents. IMW was formed in 1955 by the group who passed the inaugural exam in 1953.

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MEDIA CONTACT:
Wine Institute Communications Department, 415/356-7525
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California Wine 2018 Harvest Report: Slow and Steady Growing Season Brings Excellent Quality Across the State

10월 30, 2018

SAN FRANCISCO — Following a long growing season characterized by moderate temperatures throughout the spring and summer, California’s 2018 harvest played out like a dream for winegrowers in regions across the state. Harvest began anywhere from 10 days to three weeks later than in 2017, and vintners are reporting exceptional quality, thanks to consistent growing conditions and cooler temperatures, which allowed the grapes to mature slowly.

A few regions, including Temecula, Paso Robles and San Diego County, experienced issues with heat spikes, but most reported even temperatures throughout the season with little-to-no frost damage. As the season drew to a close, vintners braced for a compacted harvest of later-ripening varieties in early October. Vintners reported abundant yields in line with the United States Department of Agriculture’s August forecast of 4.1 million tons in 2018, up 2% from 2017, and above the historical average of 3.9 million tons. Overall, vintners are enthusiastic about both the quality and quantity of the 2018 vintage.

Experienced vineyard crews are key to a successful winegrape harvest (George Rose photo).

THE GROWING SEASON
“The mild summer weather allowed fruit to mature slowly without heat stress, and canopies are looking healthy,” said John Killebrew, winemaker for Z. Alexander Brown winery in Napa. “Crop levels looked good and quality appears very high, with balanced sugar, acid and tannin levels.”

Like many wineries in the North Coast region, Napa’s Black Stallion Estate Winery began picking two weeks later than in 2017. “Fortunately, compared to previous years, we did not see any major heat waves in the early part of harvest, so the fruit ripened evenly and stress-free,” said winemaker Ralf Holdenried.

Dennis Cakebread, chairman and senior vice president of sales and marketing for Cakebread Cellars in Rutherford, Napa Valley, reported normal to above-average yields and high-quality fruit. “We’re really happy with the grapes,” he said. “They have good flavor and balance.”

Mark Burningham, director of grower relations for Benziger Family Winery in Glen Ellen, Sonoma County, is equally optimistic about the 2018 vintage. “This is one of those years where everyone is happy,” he said. “Yields are up and quality is excellent, thanks to the moderate temperatures and dry conditions.”

“It was a compacted harvest for the Cabernet Sauvignon, coming in right on top of the large crop of Chardonnay, so tank space was at a premium,” he continued. “Labor was tight, but we managed it by scheduling far in advance.”

In Lodi, vintners began picking old-vine Zinfandel mid-September. “This year we’ve seen a later bud break, set and veraison, followed by a hot July and a cool August,” said Stuart Spencer of St. Amant Winery. “The cool temperatures in mid- to late-September led to gradual sugar accumulation and good flavor development. In general, we saw better flavors at lower sugars and the quality looks great.”

Despite ongoing challenges with drought in Santa Barbara County, vintners reported a healthy crop for 2018. “The vines produced a big, bountiful crop that we began harvesting in mid-September,” said Karen Steinwachs of Buttonwood Winery & Vineyard in Solvang. “The hottest July on record led to cool temperatures in August, continuing into September. Cold, crisp evenings kept our legendary Santa Barbara County acidity in the grapes, and the flavors are simply divine.”

California Wine 2018 Harvest Report Cover

Click here to view the full report including regional reports from Amador County, Calaveras County, Lake County, Livermore Valley, Lodi, Madera, Mendocino, Monterey, Napa Valley, Paso Robles, San Diego County, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Clara Valley, Santa Cruz Mountains, Sonoma County and Temecula Valley.

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MEDIA CONTACT:
Wine Institute Communications Department, 415/356-7525
communications@nullwineinstitute.org

California Wine Month Events Make September the Time to Visit Wine Country

8월 23, 2018

Harvest Season Events Planned Around the State, from Gourmet Weekends and Festivals to Concerts

CalWineMonth2018 Poster thumbnail

SAN FRANCISCO — September is California Wine Month, and there’s no better time to experience the excitement of the state’s annual harvest season. Across California, wineries, regional associations and other organizations are hosting exclusive tastings, festivals, live music, food pairings, grape stomps, vineyard hikes and much more.

Now in its 14th year, California Wine Month celebrates the Golden State’s 250-year winegrowing history and recognizes the achievements of California vintners and growers in preserving tradition and driving innovation. With 4,800 vintners and 5,900 growers within its borders, California is the world’s fourth-largest wine producer and the source of 81 percent of the wine made in the United States. It is also the most visited state in the U.S. for food- and wine-related activities, attracting 24 million people each year, and the producer of more than 400 specialty crops. Wine lovers can also celebrate with activities and special offers from California Wine Month partner retailers and restaurants during the month of September.

Visit our California Wine Month page to view the full list of regularly updated events and partners and to order a copy of the 2018 California Wine Month poster.

Regionwide events showcasing multiple wineries include:

NORTH COAST

Sept. 1: Taste of Sonoma, Sonoma State University’s Green Music Center.

Sept. 7-8: Winesong Weekend, various locations throughout Mendocino County.

Sept. 8: Calistoga Wine Experience, Pioneer Park, Calistoga, Napa Valley.

Sept. 15: Lake County Wine Auction, Boatique Winery, Kelseyville.

Sept. 22: Zinfandel: Stories from Napa Valley, Culinary Institute of America at Copia, Napa.

SAN FRANCISCO BAY & SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS

Sept. 2: Livermore Valley Harvest Wine Celebration, Wineries throughout the region.

Sept. 8-9: Annual Capitola Art & Wine Festival, Capitola Village in Santa Cruz County.

Sept. 8-30: Fall Passport Month, Wineries of Santa Clara Valley.

Sept. 22: Eat Drink Los Gatos, Downtown district, North Santa Cruz Ave.

Sept. 29: Livermore Valley Wine Auction, Wente Vineyards.

CENTRAL COAST: MONTEREY TO SANTA BARBARA

Sept. 1: Highway 46 West Wineries Harvest Block Party, Dark Star Cellars in Paso Robles.

Sept. 9: Taste of the Town Santa Barbara, Riviera Park Gardens.

Sept. 28: Sip & Saunter, San Luis Obispo.

INLAND VALLEYS

Sept. 13-16: Lodi Grape Festival, Lodi Event Center.

Sept. 21: Madera Wine Trail’s California Wine Month Celebration, Papagni Winery, Madera.

SIERRA FOOTHILLS

Sept. 1-30: Find the Gold in Calaveras Wine Country: A Treasure Hunt, Participating wineries.

Sept. 7-9: Lake Tahoe Autumn Food & Wine Festival, Northstar Resort, Truckee.

Sept. 8: WINEderlust River Wine Festival, Henningsen Lotus Park on the American River, El Dorado County.

Sept. 15: Sample the Sierra Farm-to-Fork Festival, Bijou Community Park, South Lake Tahoe.

Sept. 15: Barbera Festival, Terra d’Oro Wines, Amador County.

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Aug. 31-Sept. 2: The Taste, Paramount Pictures Studios, Hollywood.

Sept. 8: VINO-Palooza Wine & Music Festival, Marina Del Rey Hotel, Los Angeles.

Sept. 29: Temecula Valley CRUSH, Monte De Oro Winery, Temecula.

SEE THE COMPLETE LIST OF ALL WINERY EVENTS HERE.

For more information about exploring California’s diverse wine regions, see the Navigate the State map and directory. Wine lovers can also celebrate California Wine Month at home using these delicious recipes and wine-pairing tips.

CALIFORNIA WINE MONTH PARTNERS

California Wine Month is supported by restaurant, retail, hotel, media and association partners in California and throughout the U.S. including:

U.S. National/Regional: California Pizza Kitchen, Cooper’s Hawk Winery & Restaurants, The Culinary Institute of America, Dickie Brennan & Co. A Family of Restaurants, Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants, PF Chang’s, Safeway and Tavistock Restaurants.

California: Albertsons, Blackhawk Grille, Café del Rey, California Restaurant Association, Charlie Palmer Steak Napa, Compline, Dean & Deluca, Della Fattoria, Ferry Plaza Wine Merchant, Giordano Brothers, LA County Fair, Wine Bar (Macys), Napa Valley Grille, Pavilions, Rio Grill, San Francisco Wine School, Sky & Vine Rooftop Bar, Taj Campton Place, Tarpys Roadhouse, Visit California, VONS and Women for Winesense.

ABOUT WINE INSTITUTE

Established in 1934, Wine Institute is the public policy advocacy group of more than 1,000 California wineries and affiliated businesses that initiate and advocate state, federal and international public policy to enhance the environment for the responsible production, consumption and enjoyment of wine. California wineries generate $114 billion annually in economic activity to the U.S. economy and create 786,000 jobs across the country of which 325,000 are in California, bolstering economies through hospitality, taxes and tourism and enhancing communities through environmental sustainability.

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MEDIA CONTACT:
Wine Institute Communications Department, 415/356-7525
communications@nullwineinstitute.org

California Wine Sales in U.S. Market Hit $35.2 Billion in 2017

5월 23, 2018

SAN FRANCISCO — California wine shipments in the U.S. reached an estimated retail value of $35.2 billion in 2017, up 3% from the previous year. The state shipped 241 million nine-liter cases in the U.S. in 2017, up 1%.

California wine sales to all markets, including shipments to the U.S. and exports worldwide, were 278 million cases in 2017.

“Consumers in the U.S. and worldwide continue to trade up to higher-priced premium wines,” said Robert P. (Bobby) Koch, Wine Institute President and CEO. “The quality, selection and commitment to sustainability make California wines well-positioned for growth.”

“California wine sales in the U.S. market have grown 15% in the past decade from 209 million cases shipped in 2008 to 241 million cases in 2017,” said Jon Moramarco, founder and managing partner of BW166, and editor of the Gomberg-Fredrikson Report. “Last year the growth mainly came from premium wines priced over $10.”

According to Moramarco, demographic trends play a significant role in wine sales. While per capita consumption has been flat over the last decade, wine sales have grown in line with the legal drinking age population, which increased roughly 10 percent over the same time period. Additional trends impacting sales included wineries focusing on tasting room and direct-to-consumer sales, which accounted for nearly $2.7 billion in retail value and 5.8 million cases in 2017. Wineries also found opportunities in independent, local restaurants with wine menus listing limited production wines to appeal to consumers shifting their spending to these smaller eating establishments.

California Wine Stats 2017

“Wine is growing but in a more challenging environment, with rapid and broad retail and consumer changes,” said Danny Brager, Senior Vice President of Nielsen’s Beverage Alcohol Practice Area. “Wine selling locations in the U.S. are up 20% from a decade ago to 565,000 off- and on-premise locations, with a wide range of formats such as natural/gourmet grocery stores, no frills/value-based formats, theaters, premium bars and fast/casual on-premise outlets. There is also a diverse range of consumers, from Millennials who have less disposable income than a generation ago to Baby Boomers who are retiring and likely slowing their wine consumption as an increasing number of Americans are entering their golden years. Marketers need to find the right balance in attracting these diverse sets of consumers. E-commerce is increasingly having an impact on expanding consumer access to wine, and wineries are working on several digital platforms where wine is being sold,” he explained.

According to Nielsen-measured U.S. off-premise sales, top-selling varietals by volume are: Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, Red Blends, Pinot Grigio/Gris, Pinot Noir, Sauvignon Blanc, Merlot, Moscato/Muscat, Rosé and White Zinfandel/Blush. Rosé continues to be a phenomenal growth story, with sales volume jumping 60% compared to the previous year.

Total shipments of sparkling wine and champagne to the U.S. reached 26.3 million cases in 2017. Up 8% from the previous year, sparkling wines/champagnes accounted for a 7% share of the U.S. wine market.

THE U.S. WINE MARKET

Wine shipments to the U.S. from all production sources — California, other states and foreign producers — grew 1% to 403.4 million cases in 2017, with an estimated retail value of $62.2 billion, up 2% from the previous year. The U.S. has remained the world’s largest wine market by volume since 2010. California’s 241 million cases shipped within the U.S. in 2017 represent a 60% share of the U.S. wine market.

U.S. WINE EXPORTS

U.S. wine exports, more than 90% from California, reached $1.53 billion in winery revenues in 2017. Volume shipments were 380 million liters or 42.2 million cases. The European Union’s 28-member countries were the top market for U.S. wine exports, accounting for $553 million; followed by Canada, $444 million; Hong Kong, $119 million; Japan, $94 million; China, $79 million; South Korea, $25 million; Mexico, $23 million; Singapore, $17 million; and Philippines, $14 million.

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CALIFORNIA WINE SHIPMENTS1
(In millions of 9-liter cases)
Year
California Wine Shipments to All Markets in the U.S. and Abroad2
California Wine Shipments to the U.S. Market2
Estimated Retail Value of CA Wine to U.S.3
2017 277.9 240.7 $35.2 billion
2016 279.7 239.1 $34.3 billion
2015 278.2 233.7 $32.6 billion
2014 273.0 229.7 $31.3 billion
2013 263.8 221.2 $29.7 billion
2012 250.4 210.8 $29.0 billion
2011 265.5 224.3 $28.5 billion
2010 246.1 206.3 $28.5 billion
2009 253.2 213.8 $27.6 billion
2008 255.3 208.8 $26.1 billion
2007 241.2 198.3 $24.8 billion
2006 235.8 196.9 $24.4 billion
2005 231.6 194.1 $23.0 billion
2004 226.3 182.4 $22.2 billion
2003 211.9 177.0 $20.8 billion
2002 195.4 168.3 $21.5 billion
Sources: Wine Institute, BW166/Gomberg, Fredrikson & Associates and U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Preliminary. History revised.

1 Includes table, champagne/sparkling, dessert, vermouth, other special natural, sake and others. Excludes cider.
2 Excludes bulk imports bottled in U.S.
3 Estimated retail value includes markups by wholesalers, retailers and restaurateurs.

 

WINE SALES IN THE U.S
(Wine shipments in millions of 9-liter cases from California, other states and foreign producers entering U.S. distribution)
Year
Table Wine1
Dessert Wine2
Sparkling Wine/Champagne
Total Wine
Total Retail Value3
2017 336.3 40.8 26.3 403.4 $62.2 billion
2016 333.2 41.2 24.4 398.8 $61.1 billion
2015 325.6 40.2 21.7 387.5 $57.4 billion
2014 323.7 34.6 20.6 378.8 $55.5 billion
2013 327.0 31.6 18.9 377.5 $52.3 billion
2012 319.5 30.3 17.9 367.7 $50.8 billion
2011 308.1 31.4 17.5 357.0 $48.6 billion
2010 290.8 28.9 15.4 335.0 $46.5 billion
2009 282.4 27.2 14.0 323.5 $45.2 billion
2008 272.2 27.7 13.6 313.5 $45.0 billion
2007 272.5 26.7 13.9 313.0 $43.5 billion
2006 258.8 24.3 13.6 296.7 $41.5 billion
2005 255.4 22.5 13.1 290.9 $38.5 billion
2004 245.3 20.3 13.2 278.8 $36.2 billion
2003 237.0 17.6 12.0 266.6 $34.0 billion
2002 222.5 15.9 11.5 250.0 $33.0 billion
Sources: Wine Institute, U.S. Dept. of Commerce, and Estimates by BW166/Gomberg, Fredrikson & Associates. Preliminary. History revised. Excludes exports. Excludes cider as of 2011 going forward. Totals may not add up exactly due to rounding.

1 Includes all still wines not over 14 percent alcohol, including bulk imports bottled in the U.S.
2 Includes all still wines over 14 percent alcohol and sake, including bulk imports bottled in the U.S.
3 Estimated retail value includes markups by wholesalers, retailers and restaurateurs. Includes on- and off-premise expenditures.

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Winners Announced for Fourth Annual California Green Medal: Sustainable Winegrowing Leadership Awards

3월 29, 2018

Sustainable Winegrowing Leadership Awards logo

SAN FRANCISCO — The California Green Medal winners have been announced for the fourth annual Sustainable Winegrowing Leadership Awards. The California Green Medal recognizes the leadership of wineries and vineyards committed to sustainability and is presented by the California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance (CSWA), California Association of Winegrape Growers, Wine Institute, Lodi Winegrape Commission, Napa Valley Vintners, Sonoma County Winegrowers and Vineyard Team. Four Green Medals are presented in the following categories: Leader, Environment, Community and Business. The recipients of the Green Medal Awards will be honored at a ceremony at the California State Capitol in Sacramento on April 11, 2018.

Winners of the 2018 Green Medals are:

Green Medal Leader

LEADER AWARD, given to the vineyard or winery that excels in the three “E’s” of sustainability — Environmentally sound, socially Equitable and Economically viable practices.
Winner: Bogle Vineyards, located in Clarksburg, CA, embodies leadership in sustainability. For the past three generations, sustainability has been at its core, and they demonstrate their commitment to sustainability by certifying 1,200 acres of estate vineyards to LODI RULES for Sustainable Winegrowing and certifying their winery to Certified California Sustainable Winegrowing. Since 2010, Bogle has encouraged its partner-growers to practice sustainability by paying a total of $2.8 million in bonuses for certifying vineyards to LODI RULES, with over 92% of their grapes coming from certified vineyards. Employees are treated like family, with a dozen employees having spent 20-plus years at the company, and the average employee has been there for more than a decade. Good work relations are fostered through quarterly staff luncheons that feature presentations on the latest sustainability practices and other teambuilding exercises.

Green Medal Leader

ENVIRONMENT AWARD, given to the vineyard or winery that best demonstrates Environmental Stewardship through maximized environmental benefits from implementing sustainable practices.
Winner: St. Supéry Estate Vineyards and Winery, based in Rutherford in Napa Valley, is a 100% estate grown, sustainably farmed vineyard and winery. Driven by their commitment to environmental stewardship, they have preserved two-thirds of their acreage to promote biodiversity and protect the land for future generations. In the past three years, the winery has reduced their water use by 50% by capturing rainwater and reusing winery water for irrigation, and solar panels cover 80% of their electricity needs. St. Supéry’s Green Team educates employees on green practices and upholds a strict purchasing policy of using materials that are at least 50% post-consumer waste. The company offers incentives for carpooling to work, with 65% of employees participating.

Green Medal Leader

COMMUNITY AWARD, given to the vineyard or winery that is a Good Neighbor & Employer using the most innovative practices that enhance relations with employees, neighbors and/or communities.
Winner: KG Vineyard Management, based in Lodi, CA, is a custom farm management business committed to sustainable farming. Having vineyards certified to LODI RULES for Sustainable Winegrowing for the last 12 years, the company believes in maintaining and contributing to the legacy of healthy soil, air, water and the local community. KG is active in the area’s leadership roles and strives to fulfill a vision of success for Lodi and the surrounding community. They invest in the future–the future of the land, human resources, local youth and family. KG is a leader in fostering strong relationships with clients, employees and neighbors. KG’s employees are their biggest asset and safety training is implemented monthly and they provide training in Urdu, native to Pakistan and India, the primary language between the foremen and crews.

Green Medal Leader

BUSINESS AWARD, given to the vineyard or winery that best demonstrates Smart Business through efficiencies, cost savings and innovation from implementing sustainable practices.
Winner: Cakebread Cellars, located in Napa, CA, has been committed to sustainability since its inception in 1973. Cakebread believes that sustainability means investing in its employees to help them achieve their career objectives and enjoy healthy work/life balance. That’s why they offer a generous vacation policy and host an ongoing “Healthy, Wealthy and Wise” education series featuring outside speakers to share expertise on all elements of a healthy lifestyle. Cakebread invests in the longevity of its employees by tightly controlling operation costs and eliminating waste wherever possible. In fact, they diverted 92% of their total annual waste in the past two years. It’s not just the big initiatives or investments that define Cakebread — it’s the day-to-day details and decisions that have helped save costs and create a culture of conservation.

“The Green Medal recognizes the commitment and dedication to sustainability by California growers and vintners,” said Allison Jordan, CSWA Executive Director. “It’s always a challenge selecting four winners from the many amazing applications received from vineyards and wineries of all sizes from throughout California. The judging panel was impressed by the breadth and depth of sustainable practices being used to conserve water and energy, maintain healthy soil, protect air and water quality, preserve wildlife habitat, and enhance relations with employees and communities, all while improving the economic vitality of vineyards and wineries.”

A panel of wine and sustainability experts judged the applications for the fourth annual California Green Medal. They include Dr. Stephanie Bolton, Sustainable Winegrowing Director, Lodi Winegrape Commission; David Glancy, Master Sommelier, San Francisco Wine School; Allison Jordan, Executive Director, California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance; Kelli McCune, Senior Manager, Sustainable Conservation; Michelle Novi, Industry Relations Manager, Napa Valley Vintners; Cyril Penn, Editor in Chief, Wine Business Monthly; Kate Piontek, Vice President of Operations, Sonoma County Winegrowers; and Beth Vukmanic Lopez, SIP Certified® Manager, Vineyard Team.

Award sponsors are — Exclusive Media Sponsor: Wine Business Monthly; Gold Sponsor: Rivercap; Silver Sponsors: Protected Harvest, Farm Credit Alliance and Marin Clean Energy; and, Bronze Sponsors: CC Wine Caves and WM EarthCare.

Partnering organizations include: Fish Friendly Farming, Monterey County Vintners & Growers Association, Napa County Resource Conservation District, Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance, San Luis Obispo Wine Country Association, Santa Barbara Vintners, Sonoma Valley Vintners & Growers Alliance.

Visit the Green Medal Awards website for more information.

Celebrate “Down To Earth Month” in April with California Wine Events

3월 27, 2018
California Sustainable Winegrowing Video
New video on California Sustainable Winegrowing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Yx_LWnBp4Q
 
https://discovercaliforniawines.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/D2E.Logo_.2018_225x225-1.jpg

SAN FRANCISCO — April is the time to celebrate all things green during the seventh annual California Wines Down to Earth Month. Created by Wine Institute, the association of nearly 1,000 California wineries and affiliated businesses, the month celebrates the wine community’s commitment to the environment with sustainability-focused winery events and offers throughout the state.

Down to Earth Month engages consumers, policy leaders, media and the wine trade with eco-friendly events, such as Earth Day festivals, vineyard hikes, food & wine festivals, eco-tours and more.

“Down to Earth Month events are one of the many ways our wineries provide experiences for visitors to learn why California leads in sustainable winegrowing,” says Robert P. (Bobby) Koch, President and CEO of Wine Institute. “This year’s celebration also marks the first time that some of our wine will bear the new California Certified Sustainable logo when made in a certified winery with at least 85% of the grapes from certified vineyards.”

California is a global leader in sustainable winegrowing practices in terms of wine acreage and case production. As of November 2017, 127 wineries producing over 74% (211 million cases) of California’s total wine production and 1099 vineyards farming 134,000 acres (22% of statewide wine acreage) are CERTIFIED SUSTAINABLE.

Nearly two dozen events are happening throughout California in April with new ones being added daily here. Region-wide events include:

Signature Sonoma Valley, April 6-8, Sonoma: Experience an intimate and exclusive deep dive into the wines, terroir and people of Sonoma Valley’s historic wine region. Enjoy vineyard explorations, iconic wine tastings, designer meals and vintner talks in Sonoma Valley, part of Sonoma County, a region committed to 100% sustainability by the year 2019.

Taste of Mendocino, April 7, San Francisco: More than 30 Mendocino wineries will be bringing their best wines, and local artisanal food producers will be serving up delicious bites to complement the wines at Fort Mason in San Francisco. A gourmet marketplace, Taste of Mendocino attendees will be able to purchase products from participating wineries and food producers. Mendocino County has a high enrollment of green certifications for sustainable, organic, biodynamic and Fish Friendly farming.

April Passport Celebration Day, April 21, Santa Cruz: The winegrowing community of the Santa Cruz Mountains will come together on Passport Celebration Day to celebrate the generations of farmers, vintners and families that are the roots of this wine region. Fifty-plus tasting rooms throughout the Santa Cruz Mountains are each offering a unique winery experience, including organic and sustainable wines.

36th Annual Santa Barbara Vintners Festival, April 21, Lompoc: Taste wines from over 100 wineries and gourmet food from 30 regional restaurants. Enjoy live music and live cooking demonstrations. Many growers use sustainable practices, allowing the natural quality of the grapes to flourish. Enjoy the rare opportunity to taste an exceptional number of wines in Santa Barbara County.

50th Anniversary of the Agricultural Preserve, April 21, Rutherford: In 1968, Napa Valley Vintners and others in the community preserved open space by enacting the nation’s first Agriculture Preserve. The 2018 year marks the 50th anniversary of this ordinance establishing agriculture and open space as the best use of land for Napa County. To honor this milestone, Alpha Omega’s winemaker Jean Hoefliger will lead a tour and tasting on April 21 at historic Beckstoffer Georges III Vineyard in Rutherford, where 181 acres were placed under a land conservation easement that forever prohibits non-agriculture development. The Alpha Omega Foundation will donate 100 percent of tickets sold to local nonprofits.

27th Annual El Dorado Wine Region Passport Wine Adventure, April 21-29, Placerville: Take a beautiful drive to El Dorado Wine Region in the Sierra Foothills for exclusive hospitality at 22 wineries participating in the Annual Passport Weekends, April 21-22 & 28-29. Sustainable, organic and biodynamic practices are reflected in the wines such as those from Lava Cap Winery and Shadow Ranch Vineyard.

Earth Day Napa, April 22, Napa: Featuring exhibits, food, live entertainment, kids’ activities and wine at Oxbow Commons. Presented by Environmental Education Coalition of Napa County.

Stags Leap District Wineries: Vineyard to Vintner, April 27-29, Yountville: Visit winery open houses with special access to owners and winemakers. Enjoy caves, cellars, barrel tastings, dinners by celebrated chefs. Committed to its community, the association is donating 5 percent of open house tickets to the Napa Valley Community Foundation.

Passport to Dry Creek Valley, April 27-29, Healdsburg: One of Sonoma Wine Country’s premier wine & food festivals featuring 40-plus wineries. Tastings, food and wine pairings, and a vineyard tour highlighting how sustainability operates in the vineyards.

California Sustainable Winegrowing
The California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance (CSWA), a 501(c)(3) educational nonprofit organization established by Wine Institute and the California Association of Winegrape Growers more than a decade ago, received the governor’s top environmental award for increasing adoption of sustainable winegrowing practices in California and for initiating new educational tools and program improvements. CSWA now has 2,100 vineyards and wineries as program participants. To learn more, visit: www.discovercaliforniawines.com/sustainable-winegrowing.

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Wineries and vineyards around the state have taken an extra step by earning Certified California Sustainable Winegrowing status through the third-party certification program launched by CSWA. Certified California Sustainable Winegrowing and other statewide and regional programs such as Bay Area Green Business Program, Fish Friendly Farming, Lodi Rules, Napa Green and Sustainability in Practice (SIP) play vital roles in the California wine community’s successful efforts to produce high quality wine that is environmentally sound, economically feasible and socially responsible.


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U.S. Wine Exports Total $1.53 Billion in 2017

3월 26, 2018

Premiumization Continues Amid Challenging Exchange Rates

Toronto 2017 Wine Fair
The popular California Wine Fair in Toronto was attended by more than 1,000 trade and media.

SAN FRANCISCO — U.S. wine exports, 97% from California, reached $1.53 billion in winery revenues and 380 million liters (42.2 million cases) in 2017. Golden State exports were down 5.5% in value and 7.9% in volume due in part to the strong dollar, heavily-subsidized foreign wine producers and competitors forging free trade agreements in key markets.

“Global premiumization continues and California wines are well-positioned with our range of offerings, aspirational lifestyle, well-earned reputation for high quality and leadership in sustainable winegrowing,” said Robert P. (Bobby) Koch, President and CEO of Wine Institute.

“California wine exports have grown nearly 70% by value in the past decade. Our global marketing efforts focusing on the quality and diversity of California wine continue to gain traction with our trading partners throughout the world,” said Wine Institute Vice President of International Marketing Linsey Gallagher. Gallagher oversees Wine Institute’s California Wine Export Program, involving more than 175 wineries that export to 138 countries, and 15 representative offices conducting programs in 25 countries across the globe.

The top 10 export markets for California wines are: the European Union’s 28-member countries, accounting for $553 million, Canada, $444 million; Hong Kong, $119 million; Japan, $94 million; China, $79 million; South Korea, $25 million; Mexico, $23 million; Singapore, $17 million; Philippines, $14 million; and Dominican Republic, $13 million.

“Free trade agreements that place the U.S. on equal footing with other wine producing countries are absolutely essential to growing U.S. wine exports,” said Charles Jefferson, Wine Institute Vice President of Federal Relations and International Public Policy.

Wine Institute’s Regional Trade Directors in key export markets reported on 2017 exports:

CANADA
“Despite a flat wine market in Canada and ongoing exchange rate challenges, Canada remains the top dollar value market for California wines. Canadian consumers have confidence in the quality and value offered by California wineries whose wines are successful in all price segments,” according to Rick Slomka, Wine Institute Trade Director for Canada. “Although recent price increases may lead to slower growth, new product introductions and line extensions for popular brands have kept the momentum strong for the California wine category. U.S. wines were the number one table wine category by value in Canada in 2017 for the fourth consecutive year with almost Canadian $1.1 billion in retail sales. “We anticipate continued growth in the liquor board stores and are also looking forward to working with the provincial governments to improve and equalize access to new grocery distribution channels.”

CONTINENTAL EUROPE
“As the Euro became stronger in the past 12 months, California wine exports to continental Europe improved. In Germany for instance, our key market on the continent, German customs reported an increase in California wine imports of 7% by volume. The data also shows increases in export value to key markets such as Sweden, the Netherlands and Denmark,” said Paul Molleman, Wine Institute Trade Director for Continental Europe.

UNITED KINGDOM
“Sales of premium, super-premium and luxury Californian wines continue to be robust despite very challenging currency-led price increases. In 2016, the pound was valued at $1.46. A year later it dropped 17% to $1.21. Price increases were largely passed through to consumers as increased shelf prices. The pound has strengthened in the past six months, and we expect this will be positive for California wines in the first half of 2018 as importers look to replenish stocks at more favorable prices,” said Wine Institute United Kingdom Trade Director Justin Knock, MW.

JAPAN
“Due to the U.S. withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the Japan-EU Economic Partnership Agreement, all of the U.S.’s wine region competitors will enter Japan duty free by 2019 while the full 15% import duty will continue to be charged on California wines. Japanese importers have been importing U.S. bulk wine to reduce the import duties, but Chilean and Australian bulk wine is already duty free and European bulk will soon have duty free status. Bottled U.S. wine exports to Japan decreased 20% by volume in 2017, but value increased 12.1%. Ultra-premium wines are less susceptible to the import duty disadvantage, and Wine Institute’s Japan office has been consistently promoting the premium category with its wine-by-the-glass restaurant promotions,” said Ken-ichi Hori, Wine Institute’s Japan Trade Director. “U.S. wine importers in Japan hope the U.S. will establish a Free Trade Agreement with Japan as soon as possible to abolish the heavy import duty disadvantage of U.S. wines, which will help the entire American wine category grow in Japan.”

CHINA & PACIFIC RIM
“U.S. wine exports to Greater China (Mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan) were strong with 10% growth to over $210 million in 2017. Also experiencing growth were South Korea, Singapore and the Philippines with value increasing more than volume, signaling the premiumization trend. For Asia, the main story is the economic growth in China, the largest country in the world in terms of population. China has a rapidly growing middle class that is traveling outside the country and adopting many Western tastes and lifestyle preferences. Consumption of imported wine has increased 2.5 times in the last five years on the Chinese Mainland. We expect this trend to continue for the foreseeable future,” said Christopher Beros, Wine Institute Trade Director for China and Pacific Rim.

Since 1985, Wine Institute has served as the administrator of the Market Access Program, a cost-share export promotion program managed by the USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service. Wine Institute’s Export Program supports California Wines worldwide with a consumer website discovercaliforniawines.com in eight languages, social media campaigns in 18 countries, educational tools and videos, and a strong partnership with Visit California to increase tourism to California wine regions. Wine Institute organizes California’s participation in international trade shows and trade missions, offers master classes and seminars as well as tastings for trade, media and consumers worldwide. Last year, the program also hosted 155 international media and wine buyers from 20 countries for visits to California wine country. For information, see: Wine Institute’s California Wine Export Program

 

U.S. WINE EXPORTS*
Year to Date: January-December, 2017 and 2016
 
Value (U.S. Dollars)
Revenues to Wineries
Variance
’17 v ’16
Volume (Liters)
Variance
’17 v ’16
PARTNER COUNTRY
Ranked by 2017 Value
2017
2016
Percent
2017
2016
Percent
European Union Total** $553,098,853 $685,230,481 -19.28 197,782,763 221,141,004 – 10.56
Canada $443,865,878 $431,402,689 2.89 83,983,119 88,793,202 – 5.42
Hong Kong $118,803,938 $98,532,044 20.57 9,364,978 12,428,906 – 24.65
Japan $94,103,357 $87,488,237 7.56 23,341,643 23,613,126 – 1.15
China $78,667,031 $81,480,265 – 3.45 14,190,217 14,861,019 – 4.51
South Korea $25,454,842 $23,337,670 9.07 4,898,207 4,261,903 14.93
Mexico $22,543,709 $24,059,600 – 6.30 7,138,570 7,825,030 – 8.77
Singapore $16,579,152 $13,635,128 21.59 2,274,968 2,237,766 1.66
Philippines $13,544,471 $13,202,614 2.59 4,784,109 4,317,825 10.80
Dominican Republic $13,230,785 $13,031,174 1.53 3,199,157 3,156,701 1.34
Taiwan $13,054,883 $12,167,856 7.29 1,456,869 1,645,785 – 11.48
OTHER COUNTRIES $137,320,004 $135,946,628 1.17 $27,631,318 $28,306,756 – 2.39
WORLD TOTAL $1,530,266,903 $1,619,514,386 – 5.51 380,045,918 412,589,023 – 7.89
Sources: Wine Institute & Global Trade Information Services, using data from U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Preliminary numbers. Includes hard cider. History revised.

* Statistics exclude re-exported wine due to U.S. DOC changing its reporting to exclude this wine.
** Stats for the 28 EU countries are combined because transshipments to final destinations in neighboring countries make a country-by-country breakdown not reflective of actual consumption in each country.
To convert liters to gallons, multiply liters by .26418 To convert liters to cases, divide liters by 9.

 

U.S. WINE EXPORTS 1997-2017
Year
Volume

(In millions)

Value

(In millions of dollars)

Gallons
Liters
Cases
Revenues to Wineries
2017 100.4 380.0 42.2 $1,530
2016 109.0 412.6 45.8 <$1,620
2015 121.9 461.3 51.3 $1,603
2014 117.0 442.7 49.2 $1,494
2013 115.1 435.8 48.4 $1,553
2012 106.9 404.8 45.0 $1,336
2011 111.4 421.6 46.8 $1,297
2010 107.6 407.3 45.3 $1,064
2009 106.4 402.8 44.8 $859
2008 125.5 474.9 52.8 $963
2007 115.9 438.8 48.8 $911
2006 105.1 397.9 44.2 $843
2005 101.5 384.1 42.7 $659
2004 119.1 451.0 50.1 $796
2003 92.3 349.2 38.8 $621
2002 73.4 277.8 30.9 $542
2001 78.8 298.3 33.1 $531
2000 77.8 294.4 32.7 $551
1999 74.2 281.0 31.2 $541
1998 71.1 269.1 29.9 $532
1997 58.7 222.1 24.7 $415
Sources: Wine Institute & Global Trade Information Services, using data from U.S. Dept. of Commerce. History revised.

 

U.S. Wine Exports in Millions of Dollars

Sources: Wine Institute & Global Trade Information Services, using U.S. Dept. of Commerce data.

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California Wine 2017 Harvest Report: Strong Quality Across the State as Ample Rain Ends Drought

11월 8, 2017
Left: White grape harvest (Napa Valley Vintners photo); J Vineyards & Winery harvest in Sonoma County (George Rose photo).

SAN FRANCISCO — California’s 2017 wine harvest wrapped up early this fall following summer heat spurts and a growing season that saw significant rain throughout the state ending a five-year drought. While October wildfires in North Coast wine communities made international headlines, the state’s vineyards and wineries were not significantly affected. Napa, Sonoma and Mendocino counties, the regions most impacted, grow 12 percent of California’s winegrapes, and 90% percent of the harvest in Napa and Sonoma and 85% in Mendocino were already picked and in production at wineries before the fires.

“The vast majority of California’s 2017 winegrape harvest was unaffected by the wildfires and the vintage promises to be of excellent quality,” said Robert P. (Bobby) Koch, president and CEO of Wine. “The outpouring of support locally and from around the world for people in the impacted communities has been phenomenal. We are saddened by the loss of lives and homes and this will truly be remembered as a harvest of the heart. Wineries are at work making their 2017 wines and welcoming visitors during this beautiful late fall/early winter season.”

The Growing Season
With all but late harvest grapes in, vintners are looking back at the 2017 growing season throughout the state. The drought is over with the season beginning with rainfall that refilled reservoirs and replenished soils. Harvest began early at a normal pace in many regions, and then progressed rapidly during a heat wave in late August and early September. Temperatures cooled mid-September, slowing the harvest pace and allowing red grapes to ripen gradually. Many regions are reporting reduced yields due to the heat spell, but vintners are reporting strong quality for the 2017 vintage.

The California Department of Food and Agriculture estimated in early August that the state’s overall crop size would reach 4 million tons, down slightly from 4.03 million in 2016 and above the historical average of 3.9 million tons. The heat wave will likely lower this prediction.

“We had above average rainfall this winter on the Central Coast, but not as much as areas that saw flooding,” said Steve Lohr, CEO, J. Lohr Vineyards & Wines. “It was wonderful because it helped fill up the reservoirs and bring new life to cover crops that had been parched after several years of drought. It has been a good year for us, all in all, on the Central Coast,” Lohr said. “From the 30,000-foot perspective, I would say that these wines are going to show particularly nicely in their youth but will have the capacity to age.”

According to Neil Bernardi, vice president of winemaking at Duckhorn Wine Co., the increased rainfall also brought vine-vigor challenges. “It required special focus on cover crops and tillage and closely managing canopies. Cabernet Sauvignon grapes in Napa Valley and Alexander Valley look especially healthy,” he said. “Our Pinot Noir, Zinfandel and Merlot have excellent color, extraction and flavor, and Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay are showing excellent aromatics and great acidity.”

The rainfall helped vines in the Santa Cruz Mountains rebound from the drought, but also caused some problems during flowering. “Zinfandel got caught by spring rain during bloom and most of our Zinfandel sites are down in tonnage anywhere from 15% to 40%,” said Eric Baugher, chief operating officer and winemaker, Ridge Vineyards Monte Bello Winery. “It does appear that the Zinfandel vintage will be an extraordinary one, similar to 1999. I expect similar excellent quality out of Chardonnay since the fruit had such great intensity of flavor from the petite-size clusters and berries.”

A heat spell impacted many California regions in late summer, speeding up harvest schedules and requiring extra vigilance. “Some vineyards that had exposed fruit showed desiccation,” said David Hayman, vice president of winegrowing for Delicato Family Vineyards, which farms grapes across the state. “Ripeness was accelerated and a lot of fruit became ready all at once. Flavors across the board look good.”

Harvest Report Cover

Click here to view full report, including regional reports from Amador/Sierra Foothills, Lake County, Livermore Valley, Lodi, Madera, Mendocino, Monterey, Napa Valley, Paso Robles, San Diego County, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Clara Valley, Santa Cruz Mountains, Sonoma County and Temecula Valley.

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New Wine Institute Video Series Celebrates “California Wines: Behind the Glass”

9월 7, 2017
California Wines Behind the Glass Video Series Still
View the video at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHnENDwN2LE&list=PLd4vf2_4_2gvPg7WxbzkSN8_B_CpWgXsp

SAN FRANCISCO — Vineyard rocks absorb water like a sponge; a novice wine drinker’s eyes widen as she tastes the difference between two California Chardonnays guided by a pair of sommeliers; a winemaker describes wine as the elixir that brings people together. Wine Institute’s new video series, “California Wines: Behind the Glass,” conveys the appeal of the regions, climates, grapes and people that come together to make California wine. The short films are set with backdrops of the Golden State’s iconic and aspirational landscapes.

California Wine Month,” the first in the 23-part video series, debuted Sept. 6 on Instagram before rolling out across social media channels including Facebook, Twitter and YouTube and going live on www.DiscoverCaliforniaWines.com A new video will be posted every week with the final video, “Road Trip,” wrapping up the series on Feb. 7, 2018. The videos travel the length of California’s 800 miles of coastline, climb the mountains to consider fog and microclimates, capture sustainable winegrowing practices in action and reflect on California’s winemaking culture with its tradition of experimentation and innovation.

California produces 85 percent of U.S. wine and is the number one U.S. state for wine and food tourism with dozens of distinct wine regions, 138 American Viticultural Areas and 4,700 wineries. The California industry generates 786,000 jobs in the U.S. and attracts 24 million tourist visits to the state’s wine regions each year.

Instagram: california.wines
Twitter: CalifWines_US
Facebook: CaliforniaWines
YouTube: California Wine Institute
Website: www.DiscoverCaliforniaWines.com

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Celebrate California Wine Month in September

8월 21, 2017

Raise a Glass to Harvest at More Than 50 Winery Events Around the State

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Order this year’s California Wine Month poster, highlighting facts at a glance.

SAN FRANCISCO — September marks the 13th annual California Wine Month, and it’s the perfect time to experience the annual harvest season. Wine enthusiasts can enjoy special tastings, festivals, concerts, wine and food offerings and more at wineries and other venues throughout the state.

Vines have been grown in California for nearly 250 years, and the state is the fourth largest producer of wine in the world. California Wine Month was created to honor the culture of tradition and innovation built by the state’s 4,700 vintners and 5,900 growers and to recognize wine’s many contributions to the state and nation. 

California is the most visited state in the U.S. for food and wine-related activities, with 24 million visits to the state’s wine regions each year. California wineries offer a vast array of activities and amenities such as music, art, theater and gardens as well as hands-on visitor experiences.

Visit discovercaliforniawines.com/californiawinemonth to view a full list of events by date and get a copy of this year’s “2017 California Wine Month Facts at a Glance” poster. Or, download a map of California wine regions and the 138 American Viticultural Areas (AVAs) here. Event highlights include:

North Coast
Celebrate Sept. 1-3 with Sonoma Wine Country Weekend at Sonoma State University where top winemakers, growers and chefs will come together to celebrate the region’s finest wine and food. Stay in Sonoma for the Sonoma Valley Crush which offers hands-on harvest experiences at 12 boutique wineries Sept. 8-10.

Winesong, now in its 33rd year on Sept. 8-9, invites attendees to stroll through the lush Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens while enjoying vintages poured by wineries from Mendocino, Sonoma, Napa, and beyond. The wine and food tasting is accented by various musical groups performing jazz, classical, blues and more.

Voted on as one of the top 10 wine destinations in the world by Wine Enthusiast Magazine, the Calistoga Wine Experience on Sept. 9 in Napa Valley features wines from more than 35 Calistoga wineries and a chance to meet the owners and winemakers, enjoy appetizers and live jazz at a spectacular harvest setting.

The Lake County Wine Auction Sept. 16 is a gala evening under the stars at Cache Creek Vineyard and Winery. The evening begins with a tasting of food from a selection of 10 juried purveyors paired with local wines. Guests enjoy a gourmet meal in the farm-to-table spirit as the sun sets, followed by the live auction and dancing, all to benefit the arts and health and community organizations

San Francisco Bay & Santa Cruz Mountains
On Sept. 3 of Labor Day Weekend, wineries celebrate the exciting crush season at the Livermore Valley Harvest Wine Celebration. Wine lovers have enjoyed this unique event the last 35 years. Later in the month on Sept. 23, Livermore hosts a live auction with prizes ranging from wine to vacations to private dinners and more. The event will benefit underserved children in the East Bay with nutrition, healthcare and education.

Also on Sept. 23, the annual Eat Drink Los Gatos features restaurant food booths, live music, and shopping in charming downtown Los Gatos. Sip tastings from dozens of local wineries while touring through downtown Los Gatos enjoying wine and food at local shops and restaurants.

Central Coast: Monterey to Santa Barbara
As the sun sets Sept. 2, the Highway 46 West Harvest Block Party will take place at Dark Star Cellars. This mini wine festival is one of the more popular events on the Central Coast.

Enjoy an afternoon at Santa Barbara’s Taste of the Town featuring area wineries and more for the ultimate epicurean adventure in Santa Barbara. The event, which benefits the Arthritis Foundation, will take place on Sept. 10 at Riviera Gardens. Later in the month on Sept. 29, kick off four days of wine and culinary experiences at The Taste of Santa Barbara Wine Country. Attendees can expect to enjoy library wines, fall releases and small bites from local restaurants.

Whether you have a grand car to show or just want to stroll through the gold course enjoying the views or tasting the best of Central Coast wines, the Automotive Concourse at Monarch Dunes, on Sept. 24, offers something for everyone. Admission for spectators is free.

Inland Valleys
The 80th Annual Lodi Grape Festival celebrates Lodi agriculture while raising funds for community and charitable projects. The event is on Sept. 14-17 and will feature live music, activities for families and kids and a Friday wine tasting with Lodi wines.

On Sept. 15, guests 21+ are invited to celebrate Madera Wine Trail’s California Wine Month Celebration. This event will offer wine tasting from local wineries, food by a variety of local restaurants and live music. The Madera Vintners Association will also honor and award partners and associates that have influenced the local wine industry, the MVA and its winery members.

Sierra Foothills
Lake Tahoe Autumn Food & Wine Festival takes place the weekend of Sept. 8. Enjoy three full days of cooking seminars and demonstrations, culinary competitions, wine tastings, a Farm-to-Tahoe dinner, live music, a gourmet marketplace, and more. This is an incredible opportunity to sample the culinary and winemaking talents of regional chefs.

In South Lake Tahoe, Sample the Sierra is a unique farm-to-fork festival held on Sept. 16. The festival offers the chance to taste the creations of local Sierra Nevada talent – from food, wine and spirits to fresh produce and art. The event’s Sierra Chefs Challenge features local chefs competing for the coveted Sierra Chef title.

Southern California
At the Los Angeles TimesThe Taste, wine and food are the stars Sept. 1-3. Celebrate Southern California’s vibrant culinary scene at Paramount Pictures Studios iconic backlot, presenting five events with leading chefs and restaurants in L.A. and tastings. Guests can learn more about wine and food during special seminars and live demos.

On Sept 10, enjoy complimentary tastings from more than 25 wineries at VINO-Palooza — a wine & music festival at The Marina Del Rey Hotel, LA.

Celebrate California Wine Month Temecula style at CRUSH, a Wine & Culinary Showcase on Sept. 30. This harvest festival features 100-plus wines from more than 30 Temecula Valley wineries, paired with food from local restaurants and farms and live music. Wine lovers can purchase a SIP, Temecula Style passport, which offers savings at up to five of the 19 participating wineries any weekday during the month of September.

California Wine Month Partners
California Wine Month is supported by restaurant, retail, hotel, media and association partners in California and throughout the U.S. including:

National/Regional: California Pizza Kitchen, Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants, PF Chang’s, Safeway and Tavistock Restaurants

California: 1313 Main, Albertsons, Bistro Boudin, California Restaurant Association, Compline, Dean & Deluca, Ferry Plaza Wine Merchant, Giordano Brothers, Napa Valley Wine Train, Pavilions, San Francisco Wine School, Visit California and Vons

New York/New Jersey: Astor Wine & Spirits, BevMax, Bottle King, Chambers Street Wines, Fairway Market, Flatiron Wine & Spirits, Gary’s Wine & Marketplace, Shop Rite, Verve, Wine Awesomeness

Visit discovercaliforniawines.com for information on wine regions, wines  and winery amenities to plan a trip to California wine country. Established in  1934, Wine Institute is the association of nearly 1,000 California wineries and  wine-related businesses with the mission to initiate and advocate state,  federal and international public policy to enhance the environment for the  responsible production, consumption and enjoyment of wine. See: wineinstitute.org.

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MEDIA CONTACT:
Wine Institute Communications Department, 415/356-7525
communications@nullwineinstitute.org

California Wineries Offer Top Wine and Food Experiences Year-Round

6월 28, 2017

Wine Lovers Can Sip and Savor
at Winery Restaurants, Too

Left Ram's Gate Winery Right Cima Collina Winery

Farm-to-table wine and food experiences abound at California wineries. (Left) Culinary pairings at Ram’s Gate Winery in Sonoma County. (Right) A wine and food tasting experience at Cima Collina Winery in Carmel Valley, Monterey County.

SAN FRANCISCO – Whether a beginner or experienced wine taster, kick your California wine country experience up a notch by pairing regional wines with farm-to-fork tastes and meals.  For those who want the inside scoop on the ultimate wine and food experiences in California, Wine Institute created a list of wineries offering delicious pairings and restaurant menus year-round.

Here’s a sampling from around the state.  Discover more about winery amenities, recipes and all things California wines at discovercaliforniawines.com.

Great Wine and Food Pairing Experiences

NORTH COAST

Kendall-Jackson Wine Estate & Gardens, Sonoma County
The “Wine & Food Pairings” program includes three options.  Enjoy limited-production wines paired with cheese or chocolate, or taste through five original courses designed by Kendall-Jackson Executive Chef Justin Wangler.  Taste seasonally-changing dishes such as Sunchoke Soup with Liberty duck confit, dried cherries, mushroom and a sunchoke chip.

Ram’s Gate Winery, Sonoma County
The “Palate Play Wine & Food Pairing” lets you taste artfully crafted pairings to bring out the best in Ram’s Gate wines.  The experience begins with a glass of wine in hand for an in-depth winery tour before relaxing in a private room.  There, compare four single-vineyard wines alongside their culinary pairings in a guided, seated tasting.

B Cellars, Napa Valley
The “Oakville Trek” offers a taste of wine accompanied by a food pairing, followed by a personally escorted tour of the culinary gardens, production facilities and extensive wine caves, glass-in-hand.  After the tour, partake in a custom “B-Bite,” carefully selected and created by the chef to complement a selection of current release wines.

HALL, Napa Valley
Each month, check out “A Taste of HALL,” a culinary workshop featuring an all-star line-up of Napa Valley chefs paired with a seasonal theme.  This lively, family-style workshop teaches modern pairing techniques while tasting new release wines.

Long Meadow Ranch, Napa Valley
An elegant, intimate guided experience, “Chef’s Table” is a multi-course lunch or dinner paired with Long Meadow Ranch wines in the historic Logan Ives House. The estate chef brings the best of the season from their farm-to-guest plates, showcasing organic produce, grass-fed beef and lamb, and olive oils to complement a selection of wines.

Pine Ridge Vineyards, Napa Valley
The “Savor Pine Ridge Wine & Food Pairing” offers a tailor-made experience nestled in the wine cave, surrounded by candlelight and oak barrels. Wine educators guide you through a tasting of five Estate Cabernet Sauvignons, each paired with small bites prepared by Estate Chef Susan Lassalette. The featured wines hail from the winery’s five estate-owned vineyards in the Napa Valley – Stags Leap District, Rutherford, Oakville, Howell Mountain and Carneros.

Round Pond Estate, Napa Valley
At the “Il Pranzo Tasting Experience,” the afternoon begins with an intimate and informative estate garden tour and guided tasting of their artisan olive oils, red wine vinegars and estate wines.  While enjoying the beautiful view from the terrace, savor local artisan cheeses, meats, breads and other delectable accoutrement, as well as the season’s freshest fruits and vegetables right from their garden.  Top it all off with dessert prepared by the winery chef.  

Sequoia Grove, Napa Valley
“A Taste for Cabernet” is a private small group experience that uses Sequoia Grove’s vineyard-designated Cabernets to show how what’s in the vineyard gets into the glass and how to maximize enjoyment of Cabernet with a meal. A top-rated experience according to Where Traveler magazine.

Silver Oak, Napa Valley
The winery’s “Silver Wine & Food Pairing” gives the opportunity to experience delicious bites with Silver Oak and Twomey wines.  Chef Dominic Orsini uses local ingredients, including herbs and vegetables from their garden to create a delicious seasonal menu.

Trinchero, Napa Valley
Enjoy the “Food & Wine Pairing” in Trinchero’s Legacy Lounge to taste four delectable bites crafted by their culinary team, paired with four of the Single Vineyard wines.  The tasting will finish with a Vin Santo style Semillon with house-made Cantucci. The program also includes a tour of the winery and barrel room.

Lynmar Estate, Sonoma County
At “The Lynmar Lunch,” savor a three-course farm-to-table lunch, featuring delightful creations made from estate-grown and locally sourced ingredients paired with select Lynmar wines.

Alexander Valley Vineyards, Sonoma County
The “Wine & Cheese Pairings” at Alexander Valley Vineyards offers local artisan cheeses paired with four of their most limited-availability wines, while enjoying the views from the tasting room deck.

Dutton-Goldfield Winery, Sonoma County
Choose from three experiences at Dutton-Goldfield Winery: a Wine and Sushi Flight, Wine and Cheese Flight or Beast and Pinot Flight, all paired with limited production wines such as unoaked whites or single-vineyard Pinot Noirs. Click here for more details.

SIERRA FOOTHILLS

Vino Noceto Winery, Amador County
This Amador County winery offers a hyper-local wine and food experience.  The new “Farm-to-Fork Tour” provides in-depth education on seasonal gardening, including a trek through Noceto Farm’s Garden while sipping on Vino Noceto’s award-winning wines.

CENTRAL COAST

Cima Collina Winery, Monterey County
Hosted by Winemaker Annette Hoff Danzer, Cima Collina’s Certified Wine Specialist Shawn Bruce or a local favorite chef, the “Bring in the Experts” enhanced tasting experience offers a focus of wine production and food pairing specifically created for each group.  Cost varies depending on group size and needs.

INLAND VALLEYS

Peltier Winery & Vineyards, Lodi
The “Fruit of our Labors Day” begins with a tour through the crush pad, vineyards and winery, followed by a tank tasting and light lunch fare. The two-hour experience is on Labor Day Weekend 2017 in Acampo in the Lodi appellation.

Winery-Owned Restaurants

CENTRAL COAST

Wente Vineyards, Livermore Valley
The Restaurant at Wente Vineyards features ingredient-driven California wine country cuisine using sustainably and organically grown local ingredients.  While the menu holds its foundation in American dishes, it is influenced by French and Italian provincial cuisine.  The seasonal menu changes daily, using produce from The Restaurant’s organic garden.  The wine list offers more than 1,000 selections, providing numerous options for wine pairings.

Justin Winery, Paso Robles
The Restaurant at JUSTIN, which was named Winery of the Year 2015 by Wine Enthusiast magazine, offers fresh local ingredients in dishes that reflect the changing seasons, as well as an extensive wine list.  Executive Chef Will Torres takes full advantage of “farm-to-table” local offerings, blending savory and sweet, nouveau and traditional, and urban panache with down-home delicious.

Niner Wine Estates, Paso Robles
The Restaurant at Niner Wine Estates is one of Food and Wine magazine’s “Best Winery Restaurants in America" for 2017.  The winery team leverages close relationships with local farmers, butchers and artisans to offer farm-to-fork dishes.  Niner also mills their own estate olive oil, picks fresh eggs from their flock of chickens, and works with local roaster JOEBELLA to age their coffee beans in old NINER Wine Barrels.  Their open-kitchen lunch service reflects their goal of food-chain transparency.

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Wilson Creek Winery & Vineyards, Temecula Valley
At the Creekside Grille, Chef Steve Stawinski shaped the menu using Wilson Creek wines, locally grown fruits, vegetables, cheeses and olive oils, line-caught fresh fish and fresh herbs to create a unique blend of menu items.  Surrounded by 30-year-old Cabernet grapevines, an herb garden and flower-filled hanging baskets, the view sets the scene for an enjoyable day in wine country.

South Coast Winery Resort & Spa, Temecula Valley
The Vineyard Rose Restaurant at South Coast Winery Resort & Spa, holder of Wine Spectator’s 2015 Award of Excellence, provides a dining experience with wine for breakfast, lunch and dinner.  A casual but elegant atmosphere highlights menus featuring fresh local ingredients. Indoor/outdoor seating and an extensive wine list enhance the vineyard experience.

Thornton Winery, Temecula Valley
Café Champagne, which has earned the Gold Award for Contemporary Cuisine for over 11 years from the Southern California Restaurant Writers Association, is open daily for lunch and dinner. Executive Chef Steve Pickell, combines "Contemporary Fusion Cuisine" made with local ingredients with premium wines in a stylish indoor or outdoor patio setting.

Baily Winery, Temecula Valley
At Carol’s Restaurant, dine in style outside under the pergola next to Cabernet vines or in Bacchus Hall with its stone walls, floor to ceiling fireplace and vineyard views.  An adjacent vegetable and herb garden provides seasonal produce that Carol Baily uses in her cuisine, which you can pair with Baily’ wines.

Ponte Winery, Temecula Valley
Bouquet Restaurant offers vineyard-inspired menus and dishes that focus on fresh, seasonal and local ingredients.  Dine indoors or out at this wine country eatery, located at Ponte’s AAA Four Diamond Inn, surrounded by manicured gardens with views of the vineyard and one-acre pond.

For ideas on California wine and food road trips in more than a dozen other regions of the state, click here.

Visit discovercaliforniawines.com for information on wines and wineries throughout the Golden State and for planning a trip to California wine country. California is the number one U.S. state for wine and food tourism with 24 million visits to its wine country annually, 138 American Viticultural Areas and 4,700 wineries that produce 85 percent of U.S. wine. Established in 1934, Wine Institute is the public policy association of nearly 1,000 California wineries. See: wineinstitute.org.

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MEDIA CONTACT:
Wine Institute Communications Department, 415/356-7525
communications@nullwineinstitute.org